Publications

Working Paper
Brinton, Mary C., and Yun Zhou. Working Paper. “Doing Gender or Doing Family? Reasoning, Logic, and Emotion in the Division of Housework”.
Brinton, Mary C., and Yuko Hara. Working Paper. “Fertility Intentions and Gender-Role Specialization in Japan”.
Brinton, Mary C., and Xiana Bueno Garcia. Working Paper. “Gender Equity, Economic Uncertainty, and the Fertility Gap in Spain: A Qualitative Analysis of Fertility Ideals and Intentions”.
Forthcoming
Brinton, Mary C., and Nobuko Nagase. Forthcoming. “The Gender Division of Labor and Second Births: Labor Market Institutions and Fertility in Japan”.
Brinton, Mary C. Forthcoming.“Happiness at Work? Japanese Housewives’ and Employed Wives’ Marital Happiness”. in Happiness in Japan, edited by Barbara Holthus and Wolfram Manzenreiter.
2017
Brinton, Mary C., and Carly Knight. 2017. “One Egalitarianism or Several? Two Decades of Gender-Role Attitude Change in Europe”. American Journal of Sociology.
2016
Brinton, Mary C., and Eunmi Mun. 2016. “Revisiting the Welfare State Paradox: A Firm-Level Analysis from Japan”. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility. Publisher's Version
Brinton, Mary C., and Dong Ju Lee. 2016. “Gender-Role Ideology, Labor Market Institutions, and Postindustrial Fertility”. Population and Development Review.
Brinton, Mary C. 2016. “Intentions into Actions: Norms as Mechanisms Linking Macro- and Micro-Levels”. American Behavioral Scientist 60 (10):1146-1167.PDF icon pdf
2015
Brinton, Mary C., and Eunmi Mun. 2015. “Between State and Family: Managers' Implementation and Evaluation of Parental Leave Policies in Japan”. Socio-Economic Review 14 (2):257-281. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Work–family policies have been widely adopted in post-industrial societies. This paper brings the organizational level into the analysis of work–family policy effects on female employees. We theorize that managers' evaluation of female employees' use of parental leave is shaped not only by policy content, but also by labour market structure and the dominant cultural model of household gender relations. Using Japan as a case study, we analyse in-depth interviews with human resource managers in 25 large firms and show that managers' implementation of parental leave and their evaluation of leave-takers occur within the context of norms about ideal employee behaviour in firm-internal labour markets and about the gendered division of care work. These conflicting norms produce managerial expectations that can only be met by a small number of women. The article contributes to theory and research on work–family policies and female employment outcomes in two ways: by demonstrating the critical role of managers, and by showing how labour market structure and associated work norms together with the dominant cultural understanding of household gender relations act as filters through which managers construct their evaluations of employees who take leave.

PDF icon pdf
Brinton, Mary C, and Eunmi Mun. 2015. “Workplace Matters: The Use of Parental Leave Policy in Japan”. Work and Occupations 42:335-369. Publisher's VersionPDF icon pdf
2012
O'Day, Robin. 2012. “Review of "Lost in Transition"”. Pacific Affairs: An International Review of Asia and the Pacific. WebsitePDF icon pdf
Dierkes, Julian. 2012. “Review of "Lost in Transition"”. Economic Sociology: The European Electronic Newsletter 13 (2):50-54. WebsitePDF icon pdf
2011
Lost in Transition: Youth, Work, and Instability in Postindustrial Japan
Brinton, Mary. 2011.Lost in Transition: Youth, Work, and Instability in Postindustrial Japan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Brinton’s recent work focuses on the transformation of labor markets in postindustrial societies and the implications for young workers, especially those with less education. Her forthcoming book, Lost in Transition: Youth, Education, and Work in Postindustrial Japan is being published first in Japanese (in fall 2008; NTT Press) in order to reach a broad audience in Japan interested in the difficulties faced by young Japanese men trying to "make it" in an economic environment vastly different from what their fathers faced. The rapid increase in contingent employment and employers’ diminished commitment to "lifetime employment" have produced higher rates of part-time employment and unemployment among Japanese young men than have been seen for many decades. Using original survey data, interviews with urban high school teachers, original data sets on the high school-work transition, and in-depth interviews with a sample of male high school graduates who finished school in the depth of the Japanese recession, Brinton argues for a structural interpretation of the social malaise afflicting 21st-century Japan. She is currently revising the manuscript for an American audience.

2010
Brinton, Mary C, and Yoko Yamamoto. 2010. “Cultural Capital in East Asian Educational Systems: The Case of Japan”. Sociology of Education 83 (1):67-83.PDF icon pdf
Brinton, Mary C, and Zun Tang. 2010. “School-Work Systems in Postindustrial Societies: Evidence from Japan”. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 28 (2):215–232.PDF icon pdf
2009
Brinton, Mary C, Jan O Jonsson, David B Grusky, Matthew Di Carlo, and Reinhard Pollak. 2009. “Microclass Mobility: Social Reproduction in Four Countries”. American Journal of Sociology 114 (4):977-1036.PDF icon pdf
Brinton, Mary C. 2009.“Social Class and Economic Life Chances in Postindustrial Japan: The 'Lost Generation'”. in Social Class in Japan, edited by David Slater and Hiroshi Ishida. Routledge.
2008
Lost in Transition: Youth, Education, and Work in Postindustrial Japan
Brinton, Mary. 2008.Lost in Transition: Youth, Education, and Work in Postindustrial Japan. NTT Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Brinton’s recent work focuses on the transformation of labor markets in postindustrial societies and the implications for young workers, especially those with less education. Her forthcoming book, Lost in Transition: Youth, Education, and Work in Postindustrial Japan is being published first in Japanese (in fall 2008; NTT Press) in order to reach a broad audience in Japan interested in the difficulties faced by young Japanese men trying to "make it" in an economic environment vastly different from what their fathers faced. The rapid increase in contingent employment and employers’ diminished commitment to "lifetime employment" have produced higher rates of part-time employment and unemployment among Japanese young men than have been seen for many decades. Using original survey data, interviews with urban high school teachers, original data sets on the high school-work transition, and in-depth interviews with a sample of male high school graduates who finished school in the depth of the Japanese recession, Brinton argues for a structural interpretation of the social malaise afflicting 21st-century Japan. She is currently revising the manuscript for an American audience.
2007
The Declining Significance of Gender?
Brinton, Mary, Francine D Blau, and David B Grusky. 2007.The Declining Significance of Gender?. Russell Sage Foundation. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The Declining Significance of Gender? draws together original essays by leading American sociologists and labor economists who examine contemporary patterns of gender inequality in American labor markets and households to make theoretically informed predictions about whether we are headed for a gender-egalitarian future or not. In collaboration with David Grusky (Stanford University) and Francine Blau (Cornell University), Brinton traces the dominant theoretical paradigms governing our understanding of gender inequality in the introductory chapter of the book, and examines the engines of change or stasis inherent in each theoretical approach.

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