Christopher Jones was jointly appointed to the Departments of Classics and History in 1992, after teaching at the University of Toronto since 1965. He was appointed George Martin Lane Professor in 1997. His research interests involve later Greek literature (especially as viewed in its historical and social setting), Roman history of the imperial period, and Latin literature of the same period; he also works extensively in the field of Greek epigraphy. Professor Jones became emeritus as of July, 2010.

He is the author of Philostratus: Life of Apollonius of Tyana (Penguin, 1970), Plutarch and Rome (1971), The Roman World of Dio Chrysostom(1978), Culture and Society in Lucian (1986), Louis Robert, Le Martyre de Pionios, prêtre de Smyrne (1994, co-edited with G. W. Bowersock), Kinship Diplomacy in the Ancient World (1999), Philostratus: The Life of Apollonius of Tyana (2 volumes, Loeb Classical Library, 2005), and Letters of Apollonius, Ancient Testimonia, Eusebius's Reply to Hierocles (Loeb Classical Library, 2006), New Heroes in Antiquity: Achilles to Antinoos (2010), and Between Pagan and Christian (2014). His published bibliography currently includes over 270 items, and he maintains an updated version on Academia.edu.

He has twice been a Member in the School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and has been a Visitor in the same School three times; he has twice served as Professeur associé, École Normale Supérieure, Paris; he served as a Senior Fellow in Byzantine Studies at Dumbarton Oaks Research Institute, Washington, D.C. from 1993 to 1999; he is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada (1987), Corresponding Member of the German Archaeological Institute (1992), Fellow of the American Numismatic Society (1993), Member of the American Philosophical Society (1996), Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1998), Fellow of the Russian Society of Classicists (2001), and Correspondant étranger (2011–2017) and Associé étranger (2017–) of the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres, Paris.