Publications

2016
Visual Analysis of Hidden State Dynamics in Recurrent Neural Networks
Strobelt, H., et al., 2016. Visual Analysis of Hidden State Dynamics in Recurrent Neural Networks. lstm.seas.harvard.edu. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Recurrent neural networks, and in particular long short-term memory networks (LSTMs), are a remarkably effective tool for sequence modeling that learn a dense black-box hidden representation of their sequential input. Researchers interested in better understanding these models have studied the changes in hidden state representations over time and noticed some interpretable patterns but also significant noise. In this work, we present LSTMVis a visual analysis tool for recurrent neural networks with a focus on understanding these hidden state dynamics. The tool allows a user to select a hypothesis input range to focus on local state changes, to match these states changes to similar patterns in a large data set, and to align these results with domain specific structural annotations. We further show several use cases of the tool for analyzing specific hidden state properties on datasets containing nesting, phrase structure, and chord progressions, and demonstrate how the tool can be used to isolate patterns for further statistical analysis.

lstmvis.pdf
2015
Gehrmann, S., et al., 2015. Deploying AI Methods to Support Collaborative Writing: a Preliminary Investigation. In CHI’15 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Many documents (e.g., academic papers, government reports) are typically written by multiple authors. While existing tools facilitate and support such collaborative efforts (e.g., Dropbox, Google Docs), these tools lack intelligent information sharing mechanisms. Capabilities such as "track changes" and "diff"" visualize changes to authors, but do not distinguish between minor and major edits and do not consider the possible effects of edits on other parts of the document. Drawing collaborators’ attention to specific edits and describing them remains the responsibility of authors. This paper presents our initial work toward the development of a collaborative system that supports multi-author writing. We describe methods for tracking paragraphs, identifying significant edits, and predicting parts of the paper that are likely to require changes as a result of previous edits. Preliminary evaluation of these methods shows promising results.