Prediction

Pecan Pie Logo for "PRISEd Conversation 2020" with photo of Dr. Goodman

Blog Feature: Dr. Alyssa Goodman talks with the The Harvard College Program in Science and Engineering (PRISE)

September 23, 2020

Dr. Alyssa Goodman talks with Felicia Ho, PRISE, Harvard College '23 about Jacques Cousteau, data visualization, climate change, prediction science, and the wide arc of influences that have shaped her multifaceted career as the Robert Wheeler Wilson Professor of Applied Astronomy at Harvard. 

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Photo of Milky Way

Professors Offer Insights From Their Fields Amid COVID

July 10, 2020

In this time of profound uncertainty, society can be sure of one thing: more uncertainty. The seemingly opaque path forward for us, individually and collectively, was the Gazette’s topic with three Harvard professors, including Robert Wheeler Willson Professor of Applied Astronomy, Dr. Alyssa Goodman, who shared insights into how uncertainty is viewed in their fields, and the surprising ways in which it’s not necessarily a bad thing. ...

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New Perspectives on Star Formation, the Milky Way, and Isaac Newton, at University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, Friday, January 17, 2020:

slide screenshotThese are Alyssa Goodman's presentation slides from the 6th annual New England Star Formation Meeting, held at the University Connecticut on January 18, 2020.

These are Alyssa Goodman's presentation slides from the 6th annual New England Star Formation Meeting, held at...

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Data

We try to share all our data openly.  Much of it is in Dataverse repositories, as explained here.  

PredictionX: John Snow and the Cholera Epidemic of 1854

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2018

An in-depth look at the 1854 London cholera epidemic in Soho and its importance for the field of epidemiology.

In 1854, a cholera epidemic swept through the London neighborhood of Soho. In the course of about three weeks, over 600 people died. This incident was, tragically, not unusual in London or the rest of the 19th century world as a whole. The scourge of cholera seemed unstoppable and, even worse, unpredictable. But one doctor -- ignored by the scientific community at large -- set out to prove that he knew how cholera was spread.

Join us for this one-...

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PredictionX: Lost Without Longitude Explore the history of navigation, from stars to satellites

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2018

Humans have been navigating for ages. As we developed the tools and techniques for determining location and planning a route, navigation grew into a practice, an art, and a science. Navigational skill has long been tied to commercial, economic, and military success. However, the ability to predict when and where one will reach a distant destination is more than just a key to empire-building — it’s often a matter of life and death.

Using video, text, infographics, and Worldwide Telescope tours, we will explore the tools and techniques that navigators have used, with a particular...

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FRSEMR 27J: Prediction: From Ancient Omens to Modern Computer Simulations

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

We will discuss the variety of approaches humans have taken to predicting their own future. Early weeks will focus on Omens, Oracles, Religion and Prophecy. Next, we will move on to the so-called Scientific Revolution, exemplified by the work of Galileo, and the Age of Exploration, enabled by John Harrison's solution to finding longitude at sea. The last several weeks of the seminar will focus on predictive work in epidemiology, finance, and climate, and ultimately on work about the Universe's future. Students will conclude with a discussion of how computer models of health/wealth/...

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