Classes

Game of Stones: The Archaeology of Europe from Handaxes To Stonehenge

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022

Buried beneath modern cities, Roman amphitheaters, and Medieval churches lie subtle traces of Europe’s earlier occupants: campsites littered stone tools and animal bones, human bodies preserved in bogs and frozen in ice, and cave walls decorated with extinct animals. This course will explore European prehistory from the first settlement of Europe by Homo erectus, around a million years ago, to the building of Stonehenge, c. 2000 B.C. We will cover some of those most exciting topics in archaeology today: How similar were Neanderthals to us and why did they go extinct? ...

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The Origins and Evolution of Culture (Genes, Mind, & Culture), co-instructed with Joe Henrich

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Humans are a cultural species. Unlike other species, we are heavily reliant on learning from others to acquire many important aspects of our behavior, and this capacity for cultural transmission has given rise to a second system of inheritance that not only explains much of our contemporary behavior but has driven our species’ genetic evolution over hundreds of thousands or even millions of years. Humans are products of culture-gene coevolution. In addition to having shaped our species’ anatomy and physiology, cultural evolution has important implications for understanding human nature, and... Read more about The Origins and Evolution of Culture (Genes, Mind, & Culture), co-instructed with Joe Henrich

Lithic Technology

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

Stone tools are the oldest known human technology. They represent the most abundant and arguably one of the most informative elements of the archaeological record for reconstructing ancient human behavior over the last 3.3 million years. In this graduate seminar that is open to undergraduates with permission, students are provided with a solid methodological and theoretical grounding in how to interpret stone (lithic) tools. The...

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Quantitative Methods for Archaeologists

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

This course provides graduate and advanced undergraduate students an introduction to quantitative methods utilized in archaeological research. Students will study research design, sampling strategies, probability theory, and parametric and nonparametric statistical approaches.  These issues and techniques will be addressed through lecture, in-class problem sets, and take-home assignments.