ABOUT


Ahmed Ragab is the Richard T. Watson Associate Professor of Science and Religion, and affiliate associate professor of the history of science at Harvard University. He received his MD from Cairo University in 2005, and his PhD from the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris in 2010. He is the author of The Medieval Islamic Hospital: Medicine, Religion and Charity (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Piety and Patienthood in Medieval Islam (Routledge Press, 2018), and Medicine and Religion in the Life of an Ottoman Sheikh (Routledge Press, 2018—in press).

 

He is working on two new book projects. The first, co-authored with Prof. Katharine Park, is entitled Communities of Knowledge: Science in Medieval Europe and Islamdom (Under contract with Princeton University Press), and traces a connected history of science across traditional geographic and temporal boundaries using objects to investigate scientific thought and practice. The second, entitled Around the Clock: Time in Medieval Islamic Clinical Culture (Under contract with Johns Hopkins University Press), analyzes time as an epistemic and cultural category in medical thought and practice.

 

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Featured Books

medicine and religion in the life of an ottoman sheikh

Medicine and Religion in the Life of an Ottoman Sheikh

December 10, 2018

 

In 1768, Aḥmad al-Damanhūrī became the rector (shaykh) of al-Azhar, which was one of the most authoritative and respected positions in the Ottoman Empire. He occupied this position until his death. Despite being a prolific author, whose writings are largely extant, al-Damanhūrī remains almost unknown, and much of his work awaits study and analysis. This book aims to shed light on...

Read more about Medicine and Religion in the Life of an Ottoman Sheikh
Piety and Patienthood in Medieval Islam

Piety and Patienthood in Medieval Islam. London: Routledge Press, 2018.

April 30, 2018

How did pious medieval Muslims experience health and disease? Rooted in the prophet’s experiences with medicine and healing, Muslim pietistic literature developed cosmologies in which physical suffering and medical interventions interacted with religious obligations and spiritual health. This book traces the development of prophetic medical literature and religious writings around health and disease to give a new perspective on how patienthood was conditioned by the intersection of medicine and Islam.

... Read more about Piety and Patienthood in Medieval Islam. London: Routledge Press, 2018.
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