Brain-computer interface-based control of closed-loop brain stimulation: attitudes and ethical considerations

Citation:

Klein E, Goering S, Gagne J, Shea CV, Franklin R, Zorowitz S, Dougherty DD, Widge AS. Brain-computer interface-based control of closed-loop brain stimulation: attitudes and ethical considerations. Brain-Computer Interfaces. 2016;3 (3) :140–148.

Abstract:

Patients who have undergone deep brain stimulation (DBS) for emerging indications have unique perspectives on ethical challenges that may shape trial design and identify key design features for BCI-driven DBS systems. DBS research in cognitive and emotional disorders has generated significant ethical interest. Much of this work has focused on developing ethical guidelines and recommendations for open-loop DBS systems. While early trials of open-loop DBS for depression gave disappointing results, research is moving toward clinical trials with closed-loop or patient-controllable DBS systems that may modulate aspects of personality and emotion. Though user-centered design is an increasingly important principle in neurotechnology, the perspectives of implanted individuals on ethical issues raised by DBS are poorly understood. We solicited those perspectives through a focus group and set of qualitative interviews of participants in trials of DBS for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. We identified four major themes: control over device function, authentic self, relationship effects, and meaningful consent. Each has implications for the design of closed-loop systems for non-motor disorders.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 09/30/2016