Publications

2003
Barro RJ. Have No Fear: Bush's Tax Plan Won't Jack Up Interest Rates. Business Week. 2003. 03_0505_bushtaxplan_bw.pdf
Barro RJ. South Korea: How to Keep the Miracle Going. Business Week. 2003. 03_0609_skorea_bw.pdf
Barro RJ. Why the Second Half Looks More Solid Every Day. Business Week. 2003. 03_0825_secondhalf_bw.pdf
Barro RJ. The Stubborn Jobless Rate: Puzzling, But Far From Scary. Business Week. 2003. 03_0929_stubbornjoblessrate_bw.pdf
Barro RJ. What's in a Name For Black Job Seekers?. Business Week. 2003. 03_1103_whatsinaname_bw.pdf
Barro RJ. The GOP Doth Protect Too Much, Methinks. Business Week. 2003. 03_1215_thegop_bw.pdf
Barro R, McCleary RM. Religion and Economic Growth. 2003.Abstract

Empirical research on the determinants of economic growth has typically neglected the influence of religion. To fill this gap, we use international survey data on religiosity for a broad panel of countries to investigate the effects of church attendance and religious beliefs on economic growth. To isolate the direction of causation from religiosity to economic performance, we use instrumental variables suggested by our analysis of systems in which church attendance and beliefs are the dependent variables. The instruments are dummy variables for the presence of state religion and for regulation of the religion market, an indicator of religious pluralism, and the composition of religions. We find that economic growth responds positively to the extent of religious beliefs, notably those in hell and heaven, but negatively to church attendance. That is, growth depends on the extent of believing relative to belonging. These results accord with a perspective in which religious beliefs influence individual traits that enhance economic performance. The beliefs are, in turn, the principal output of the religion sector, and church attendance measures the inputs to this sector. Hence, for given beliefs, more church attendance signifies more resources used up by the religion sector.

Barro R, McCleary RM. International Determinants of Religiosity. 2003.Abstract

Two important theories of religiosity are the secularization hypothesis and the religion market model. According to the former theory, economic development reduces religious participation and beliefs. According to the latter theory, religiosity depends on the presence of a state religion, regulation of the religion market, suppression of organized religion under Communism, and the degree of religious pluralism. We assess the theories by using survey information for 61 countries over the last 20 years on church attendance and religious beliefs. In accordance with the secularization view, overall economic development—represented by per capita GDP—tends to reduce religiosity. Moreover, instrumental estimates suggest that this link reflects causation from economic development to religiosity, rather than the reverse. The presence of an official state religion tends to increase religiosity, probably because of the subsidies that flow to organized religion. However, in accordance with the religion-market model, religiosity falls with government regulation of the religion market, Communist suppression, and a reduction in religious pluralism. Although religiosity declines overall with economic development, the nature of the interaction varies with the dimension of development. For example, religiosity is positively related to education and the presence of children and negatively related to urbanization.

religion_paper_ajs_revised.pdf
Barro R. Bush’s Tax Cuts: Reagonomics Redux?. Business Week. 2003. bw0301202.jpg
Barro R. There’s a Lot to Like in Bush’s Tax Plan. Business Week. 2003.
Barro R. A Democratic Iraq Isn’t An Impossible Dream. Business Week. 2003.
Barro R. Have No Fear: Bush’s Tax Plan Won’t Jack Up Interest Rates. Business Week. 2003.
Barro R. South Korea: How to Keep the Miracle Growing. Business Week. 2003. bw030609-2.pdf
Barro R. Why the Second Half Looks More Solid Every Day. Business Week. 2003. businessweek-aug25.pdf
Barro R. The Stubborn Jobless Rate: Puzzling, but Far from Scary. Business Week. 2003. busweek929.pdf
Barro R. What’s in a Name for Black Job Seekers?. Business Week. 2003. business-weeknov3.pdf
Barro R. The GOP Doth Protect Too Much, Methinks. Business Week. 2003. bw-dec15.pdf
Barro R. Quantity and Quality of Economic Growth. In: Loayza N, Soto R The Challenges of Economic Growth. Central Bank of Chile ; 2003.
Barro R. Currency Unions for the World. In: Monetary and Financial Integration in East Asia, v. 2. Asian Development Bank ; 2003.
Barro R. Economic Growth across Countries. Crecimiento y Convergencia. 2003;2.

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