Publications

2014
Hoeppner BB, Kahler CW, Gwaltney CJ. Relationship between momentary affect states and self-efficacy in adolescent smokers. Health Psychology. 2014;33 (12) :1507-1517.Abstract

Objective: Relapse to smoking after making a quit attempt is both common and rapid in adolescent smokers. Momentary self-efficacy (SE)—that is, momentary shifts in one’s confidence in the ability to abstain from smoking—predicts the occurrence and timing of relapse among adolescent smokers. Therefore, it is important to identify factors that are associated with changes in momentary SE early in a quit attempt. This study examined the relationship between affect states (including positive, negative, and nicotine withdrawal states) and momentary SE at various stages of a quit attempt. Method: Adolescent daily smokers interested in making a quit attempt (n = 202) completed ecological momentary assessments (EMA) each day for 1 week leading up to and 2 weeks after a quit attempt. In each assessment, they reported current SE and affect state. Results: Results of linear mixed models indicated that most of the examined affect states were related to momentary SE. Contrary to expectation, they were related to momentary SE both immediately before and after the quit attempt. Moderation effects were observed for select affect states, where higher baseline SE was related to lower momentary SE in the presence of increasing negative high activation, boredom, and difficulty concentrating. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that both positive and negative affect states are related to SE, and that thereby positive affect enhancement may be a promising, underutilized treatment target. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)

Hoeppner BB, Bidwell LC, Colby SM, Barnett NP. Smoking patterns and their relationship to drinking among first-year college students. Nicotine & Tobacco Research. 2014;16 (6) :743-752.Abstract

Introduction: Unlike older smokers, young adult smokers frequently engage in light and intermittent smoking. It remains unclear how stable such smoking patterns are over time, as substantial variability exists between these smokers. This study identified subgroups of college student smokers based on the trajectory of their smoking frequency during the first year of college, thereby examining stability versus instability over time. We then tested if the interplay between drinking and smoking differed in the identified groups to determine the relative role drinking may play in intermittent versus more regular smoking. Methods: Incoming college students at 3 institutions completed online biweekly surveys of their daily substance use throughout the first year of college. Students who reported smoking at least 1 cigarette during this year (n = 266) were included in analyses (70% female, 74% White). Results: Group-based trajectory modeling identified 5 groups of smokers, 3 of which maintained their smoking frequency throughout the year (77%), and 2 groups of infrequent smokers showed significant trends (11% increasing, 12% decreasing). Notably, nondaily smoking was maintained at different specific frequencies (e.g., 1 vs. 3 days per week). Identified groups differed in the relationship between drinking and smoking, where cooccurrence was particularly strong among infrequent smokers, and trends in smoking quantity differed between groups. Conclusions: While there was a diversity of smoking patterns in the sample, patterns of intermittent smoking remain relatively stable for a majority of students throughout the year. Intervention messages targeting drinking and smoking should be tailored on the basis of smoking frequency. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)

Schuman-Olivier Z, Weiss RD, Hoeppner BB, Borodovsky J, Albanese MJ. Emerging adult age status predicts poor buprenorphine treatment retention. J Subst Abuse Treat. 2014.Abstract
Emerging adults (18-25years old) are often poorly retained in substance use disorder treatment. Office-based buprenorphine often enhances treatment retention among people with opioid dependence. In this study, we examined the records of a collaborative care buprenorphine treatment program to compare the treatment retention rates of emerging adults versus older adults. Subjects were 294 adults, 71 (24%) aged 18-25, followed in treatment with buprenorphine, nurse care management, and an intensive outpatient program followed by weekly psychosocial treatment. Compared to older adults, emerging adults remained in treatment at a significantly lower rate at 3months (56% versus 78%) and 12months (17% versus 45%), and were significantly more likely to test positive for illicit opioids, relapse, or drop out of treatment. Further research into factors associated with buprenorphine treatment retention among emerging adults is needed to improve treatment and long-term outcomes in this group.
Bergman BG, Greene CM, Hoeppner BB, Slaymaker V, Kelly JF. Psychiatric comorbidity and 12-step participation: a longitudinal investigation of treated young adults. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2014;38 (2) :501-10.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Evidence indicates that 12-step mutual-help organizations (MHOs), such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA), can play an important role in extending and potentiating the recovery benefits of professionally delivered addiction treatment among young adults with substance use disorders (SUD). However, concerns have lingered regarding the suitability of 12-step organizations for certain clinical subgroups, such as those with dual diagnosis (DD). This study examined the influence of diagnostic status (DD vs. SUD-only) on both attendance and active involvement (e.g., having a sponsor, verbal participation during meetings) in, and derived benefits from, 12-step MHOs following residential treatment. METHODS: Young adults (N = 296; 18 to 24 years old; 26% female; 95% Caucasian; 47% DD [based on structured diagnostic interview]), enrolled in a prospective naturalistic study of SUD treatment effectiveness, were assessed at intake and 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment on 12-step attendance/active involvement and percent days abstinent (PDA). t-Tests and lagged, hierarchical linear models (HLM) examined the extent to which diagnostic status influenced 12-step participation and any derived benefits, respectively. RESULTS: For DD and SUD-only patients, posttreatment attendance and active involvement in 12-step organizations were similarly high. Overall, DD patients had significantly lower PDA relative to SUD-only patients. All patients appeared to benefit significantly from attendance and active involvement on a combined 8-item index. Regarding the primary effects of interest, significant differences did not emerge in derived benefit between DD and SUD-only patients for either attendance (p = 0.436) or active involvement (p = 0.062). Subsidiary analyses showed, however, that DD patients experienced significantly greater abstinence-related benefit from having a 12-step sponsor. CONCLUSIONS: Despite concerns regarding the clinical utility of 12-step MHOs for DD patients, findings indicate that DD young adults participate and benefit as much as SUD-only patients, and may benefit more from high levels of active involvement, particularly having a 12-step sponsor. Future work is needed to clarify how active 12-step involvement might offset the additional recovery burden of a comorbid mental illness on substance use outcomes.
Hoeppner BB, Bidwell CL, Colby SM, Barnett NP. Smoking patterns and their relationship to drinking among first-year college students. Nicotine Tob Res. 2014;16 (6) :743-52.Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Unlike older smokers, young adult smokers frequently engage in light and intermittent smoking. It remains unclear how stable such smoking patterns are over time, as substantial variability exists between these smokers. This study identified subgroups of college student smokers based on the trajectory of their smoking frequency during the first year of college, thereby examining stability versus instability over time. We then tested if the interplay between drinking and smoking differed in the identified groups to determine the relative role drinking may play in intermittent versus more regular smoking. METHODS: Incoming college students at 3 institutions completed online biweekly surveys of their daily substance use throughout the first year of college. Students who reported smoking at least 1 cigarette during this year (n = 266) were included in analyses (70% female, 74% White). RESULTS: Group-based trajectory modeling identified 5 groups of smokers, 3 of which maintained their smoking frequency throughout the year (77%), and 2 groups of infrequent smokers showed significant trends (11% increasing, 12% decreasing). Notably, nondaily smoking was maintained at different specific frequencies (e.g., 1 vs. 3 days per week). Identified groups differed in the relationship between drinking and smoking, where cooccurrence was particularly strong among infrequent smokers, and trends in smoking quantity differed between groups. CONCLUSIONS: While there was a diversity of smoking patterns in the sample, patterns of intermittent smoking remain relatively stable for a majority of students throughout the year. Intervention messages targeting drinking and smoking should be tailored on the basis of smoking frequency.
Bergman BG, Greene CM, Slaymaker V, Hoeppner BB, Kelly JF. Young adults with co-occurring disorders: substance use disorder treatment response and outcomes. J Subst Abuse Treat. 2014;46 (4) :420-8.Abstract
Compared to other life stages, young adulthood (ages 18-24) is characterized by qualitative differences including the highest rates of co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (COD). Little is known, however, regarding young adults' response to substance use disorder (SUD) treatment, especially those with COD. Greater knowledge in this area could inform and enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of SUD care for this patient population. The current study investigated differences between 141 COD and 159 SUD-only young adults attending psychiatrically-integrated residential SUD treatment on intake characteristics, during-treatment changes on clinical targets (e.g., coping skills; abstinence self-efficacy), and outcomes during the year post-discharge. Contrary to expectations, despite more severe clinical profiles at intake, COD patients showed similar during-treatment improvements on clinical target variables, and comparable post-treatment abstinence rates and psychiatric symptoms. Clinicians referring young adults with COD to specialized care may wish to consider residential SUD treatment programs that integrate evidence-based psychiatric services.
2013
Cather C, Dyer MA, Burrell HA, Hoeppner BB, Goff DC, Evins AE. An Open Trial of Relapse Prevention Therapy for Smokers With Schizophrenia. Journal of Dual Diagnosis. 2013;9 (1) :87-93.Abstract

Objective: Following successful smoking cessation, smokers with schizophrenia are vulnerable to relapse shortly after treatment discontinuation. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a 12-month relapse prevention intervention in recently abstinent smokers with schizophrenia. Method: Adult outpatient smokers with schizophrenia received weekly cognitive-behavioral therapy groups, bupropion slow-release, transdermal nicotine patch, and nicotine gum or lozenge for 3 months. Subjects with 7-day point prevalence abstinence at month 3 received an additional 12 months (months 4 through 15) of therapy with bupropion, transdermal nicotine patch, and nicotine gum/lozenge in conjunction with relapse prevention–based cognitive-behavioral therapy groups that were held weekly in month 4, biweekly in months 5 and 6, and monthly in months 7 through 15. Results: Seventeen of 41 participants (41.5%) attained biochemically verified self-report of 7-day point prevalence abstinence at the end of 3 months of treatment and entered relapse prevention treatment. There was an 81% attendance rate at relapse prevention groups. At the end of the 12-month relapse prevention phase (month 15 overall), 11 of 17 (64.7%) demonstrated biochemically verified 7-day point prevalence abstinence, and 10 of 17 (58.8%) reported 4-week continuous abstinence. Almost one-quarter of the sample (23.5%) demonstrated long-term prolonged abstinence through the end of the trial. There were no clinically detected cases of psychiatric symptom exacerbation. One participant, who was managed as an outpatient, self-reported psychiatric symptom exacerbation in the interim period between study visits. Conclusions: Extended-duration smoking cessation treatment is well tolerated and may improve smoking outcomes for recently abstinent smokers with schizophrenia. Controlled trials are warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)

Labbe AK, Greene C, Bergman BG, Hoeppner B, Kelly JF. The importance of age composition of 12-step meetings as a moderating factor in the relation between young adults' 12-step participation and abstinence. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013;133 (2) :541-7.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Participation in 12-step mutual help organizations (MHO) is a common continuing care recommendation for adults; however, little is known about the effects of MHO participation among young adults (i.e., ages 18-25 years) for whom the typically older age composition at meetings may serve as a barrier to engagement and benefits. This study examined whether the age composition of 12-step meetings moderated the recovery benefits derived from attending MHOs. METHOD: Young adults (n=302; 18-24 years; 26% female; 94% White) enrolled in a naturalistic study of residential treatment effectiveness were assessed at intake, and 3, 6, and 12 months later on 12-step attendance, age composition of attended 12-step groups, and treatment outcome (Percent Days Abstinent [PDA]). Hierarchical linear models (HLM) tested the moderating effect of age composition on PDA concurrently and in lagged models controlling for confounds. RESULTS: A significant three-way interaction between attendance, age composition, and time was detected in the concurrent (p=0.002), but not lagged, model (b=0.38, p=0.46). Specifically, a similar age composition was helpful early post-treatment among low 12-step attendees, but became detrimental over time. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment and other referral agencies might enhance the likelihood of successful remission and recovery among young adults by locating and initially linking such individuals to age appropriate groups. Once engaged, however, it may be prudent to encourage gradual integration into the broader mixed-age range of 12-step meetings, wherein it is possible that older members may provide the depth and length of sober experience needed to carry young adults forward into long-term recovery.
Schuman-Olivier Z, Hoeppner BB, Weiss RD, Borodovsky J, Shaffer HJ, Albanese MJ. Benzodiazepine use during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence: clinical and safety outcomes. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013;132 (3) :580-6.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prescribing benzodiazepines during buprenorphine treatment is a topic of active discussion. Clinical benefit is unclear. Overdose, accidental injury, and benzodiazepine misuse remain concerns. We examine the relationship between benzodiazepine misuse history, benzodiazepine prescription, and both clinical and safety outcomes during buprenorphine treatment. METHODS: We retrospectively examined outpatient buprenorphine treatment records, classifying patients by past-year benzodiazepine misuse history and approved benzodiazepine prescription at intake. Primary clinical outcomes included 12-month treatment retention and urine toxicology for illicit opioids. Primary safety outcomes included total emergency department (ED) visits and odds of an ED visit related to overdose or accidental injury during treatment. RESULTS: The 12-month treatment retention rate for the sample (N=328) was 40%. Neither benzodiazepine misuse history nor benzodiazepine prescription was associated with treatment retention or illicit opioid use. Poisson regressions of ED visits during buprenorphine treatment revealed more ED visits among those with a benzodiazepine prescription versus those without (p<0.001); benzodiazepine misuse history had no effect. The odds of an accidental injury-related ED visit during treatment were greater among those with a benzodiazepine prescription (OR: 3.7, p<0.01), with an enhanced effect among females (OR: 4.7, p<0.01). Overdose was not associated with benzodiazepine misuse history or prescription. CONCLUSIONS: We found no effect of benzodiazepine prescriptions on opioid treatment outcomes; however, benzodiazepine prescription was associated with more frequent ED visits and accidental injuries, especially among females. When prescribing benzodiazepines during buprenorphine treatment, patients need more education about accidental injury risk. Alternative treatments for anxiety should be considered when possible, especially among females.
Kelly JF, Hoeppner BB. Does Alcoholics Anonymous work differently for men and women? A moderated multiple-mediation analysis in a large clinical sample. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013;130 (1-3) :186-93.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) began as a male organization, but about one third is now female. Studies have found that women participate at least as much as men and benefit equally from AA, but it is unclear whether women benefit from AA in the same or different ways as men. This study tested whether gender moderated the mechanisms through which AA aids recovery. METHODS: A cohort study of alcohol dependent adults (N=1726; 24% female; Project MATCH) was assessed on AA attendance during treatment; with mediators at 9 months; outcomes (Percent Days Abstinent [PDA] and Drinks per Drinking Day [DDD]) at 15 months. Multiple mediator models tested whether purported mechanisms (i.e., self-efficacy, depression, social networks, spirituality/religiosity) explained AA's effects differently for men and women controlling for baseline values, mediators, treatment, and other confounders. RESULTS: For PDA, the proportion of AA's effect accounted for by the mediators was similar for men (53%) and women (49%). Both men and women were found to benefit from changes in social factors but these mechanisms were more important among men. For DDD, the mediators accounted for 70% of the effect of AA for men and 41% for women. Again, men benefitted mostly from social changes. Independent of AA's effects, negative affect self-efficacy was shown to have a strong relationship to outcome for women but not men. CONCLUSIONS: The recovery benefits derived from AA differ in nature and magnitude between men and women and may reflect differing needs based on recovery challenges related to gender-based social roles and drinking contexts.
Sutfin EL, McCoy TP, Morrell HER, Hoeppner BB, Wolfson M. Electronic cigarette use by college students. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2013;131 (3) :214-21.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, are battery operated devices that deliver nicotine via inhaled vapor. There is considerable controversy about the disease risk and toxicity of e-cigarettes and empirical evidence on short- and long-term health effects is minimal. Limited data on e-cigarette use and correlates exist, and to our knowledge, no prevalence rates among U.S. college students have been reported. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette use and identify correlates of use among a large, multi-institution, random sample of college students. METHODS: 4444 students from 8 colleges in North Carolina completed a Web-based survey in fall 2009. RESULTS: Ever use of e-cigarettes was reported by 4.9% of students, with 1.5% reporting past month use. Correlates of ever use included male gender, Hispanic or "Other race" (compared to non-Hispanic Whites), Greek affiliation, conventional cigarette smoking and e-cigarette harm perceptions. Although e-cigarette use was more common among conventional cigarette smokers, 12% of ever e-cigarette users had never smoked a conventional cigarette. Among current cigarette smokers, e-cigarette use was negatively associated with lack of knowledge about e-cigarette harm, but was not associated with intentions to quit. CONCLUSIONS: Although e-cigarette use was more common among conventional cigarette smokers, it was not exclusive to them. E-cigarette use was not associated with intentions to quit smoking among a sub-sample of conventional cigarette smokers. Unlike older, more established cigarette smokers, e-cigarette use by college students does not appear to be motivated by the desire to quit cigarette smoking.
Gorrindo T, Goldfarb E, Chevalier L, Hoeppner BB, Birnbaum RJ, Meller B, Alpert JE, Herman J, Weiss AP. Interprofessional differences in disposition decisions: results from a standardized web-based patient assessment. Psychiatr Serv. 2013;64 (8) :808-11.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This study examined differences in disposition decisions among mental health professionals using a standardized Web-based simulation. METHODS: Using a Web-based simulation that described, across users, the same complex psychiatric patient, credentialed clinicians in a psychiatry department conducted a violence risk assessment and selected a level of follow-up care. RESULTS: Of 410 clinicians who completed the simulation, 60% of psychiatrists were more likely than other types of clinicians to select higher levels of care (inpatient or emergency services) for the standardized virtual patient (odds ratio=2.67, 95% confidence interval=1.67-4.25), even after adjustment for other factors. Virtual actions taken, such as contracting with the patient for safety and discussing hospitalization, elucidated these training differences. CONCLUSIONS: Training backgrounds were important determinants of clinicians' actions and the dispositions they recommended for a psychiatric patient at high risk of self-harm and harm to others in the educational setting and may suggest the need for further training to standardize and optimize care.
Topor DR, Swenson L, Hunt JI, Birmaher B, Strober M, Yen S, Hoeppner BB, Case BG, Hower H, Weinstock LM, et al. Manic symptoms in youth with bipolar disorder: factor analysis by age of symptom onset and current age. J Affect Disord. 2013;145 (3) :409-12.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Factor analysis has been used to identify potential clinical subtypes of mania in pediatric bipolar disorder. Results vary in the number of factors retained. The present study used a formal diagnostic instrument to examine how symptoms of mania in young people are expressed, depending on age of symptom onset and current age. METHODS: Trained clinicians completed the Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS) Mania Rating Scale (MRS) with parents of 163 children with child-onset of symptoms (before age 12), 94 adolescents with child-onset of symptoms, and 90 adolescents with adolescent-onset of symptoms (after age 12). Factor analysis of symptom ratings during the most severe lifetime manic episode was performed for each age group. RESULTS: Symptom factor structures were established for each age group. Two factors were evident for children with child-onset of symptoms ("activated/pleasure seeking" and "labile/disorganized"), one factor was present for adolescents with child-onset of symptoms ("activated/pleasure seeking/disorganized") and two factors were evident for adolescents with adolescent-onset of symptoms ("activated/pleasure seeking" and "disorganized/psychotic"). The factor structures for children with child-onset and adolescents with adolescent-onset of symptoms were highly similar, with the latter factor structure including psychotic symptoms. LIMITATIONS: Limitations include reliance on retrospective parent report and potential issues with generalizability. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest mania symptomatology is largely similar when examined by both age of onset and current age, with some notable differences. Specifically, psychotic symptoms begin emerging as a distinct factor in adolescents with adolescent-onset of symptoms.
Hoeppner BB, Paskausky AL, Jackson KM, Barnett NP. Sex differences in college student adherence to NIAAA drinking guidelines. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2013;37 (10) :1779-86.Abstract
BACKGROUND: Exceeding nationally recommended drinking limits puts individuals at increased risk of experiencing harmful effects due to alcohol consumption. Both weekly and daily limits exist to prevent harm due to toxicity and intoxication, respectively. It remains unclear how well college students adhere to recommended limits, and whether their drinking is sensitive to the wider sex difference in weekly versus daily drinking limits. METHODS: This study used a daily-level, academic-year-long, multisite sample to describe adherence to NIAAA daily (no more than 4 drinks per day for men, 3 drinks per day for women) and weekly (no more than 14 drinks per week for men, 7 drinks per week for women) drinking guidelines, and to test for sex differences and time effects. College students (n = 992; 58% female) reported daily drinking on a biweekly basis using web-based surveys throughout their first year of college. RESULTS: Women exceeded weekly limits more frequently (15% of weeks [14 to 17%]) than men (12% [10 to 14%]). Women and men exceeded daily drinking limits similarly often (25 and 27%, respectively). In a generalized estimating equations analysis across all 18 biweekly assessments, adjusted for covariates and a linear trend over time, women were more likely to exceed weekly guidelines compared to men. Sex differences in exceeding daily limits were not significant. Over time, rates of exceeding limits declined for daily limits but only for men for weekly limits. CONCLUSIONS: Female college students are more likely to exceed weekly alcohol intake limits than men. Furthermore, trends over time suggest that college students may be maturing out of heavy episodic drinking, but women may not mature out of harmful levels of weekly drinking. The observed disparity in risk for long-term health consequences may represent a missed opportunity for education and intervention.
Hower H, Case BG, Hoeppner B, Yen S, Goldstein T, Goldstein B, Birmaher B, Weinstock L, Topor D, Hunt J, et al. Use of mental health services in transition age youth with bipolar disorder. J Psychiatr Pract. 2013;19 (6) :464-76.Abstract
OBJECTIVES: There is concern that treatment of serious mental illness in the United States declines precipitously following legal emancipation at age 18 years and transition from specialty youth clinical settings. We examined age transition effects on treatment utilization in a sample of youth with bipolar disorder. METHODS: Youth with bipolar disorder (N=413) 7-18 years of age were assessed approximately twice per year (mean interval 8.2 months) for at least 4 years. Annual use of any individual, group, and family therapy, psychopharmacology visits, and hospitalization at each year of age, and monthly use from ages 17 through 19 years, were examined. The effect of age transition to 18 years on monthly visit probability was tested in the subsample with observed transitions (n=204). Putative sociodemographic moderators and the influence of clinical course were assessed. RESULTS: Visit probabilities for the most common modalities-psychopharmacology, individual psychotherapy, and home-based care- generally fell from childhood to young adulthood. For example, the annual probability of at least one psychopharmacology visit was 97% at age 8, 75% at age 17, 60% at age 19, and 46% by age 22. Treatment probabilities fell in transitionage youth from age 17 through 19, but a specific transition effect at age 18 was not found. Declines did not vary based on sociodemographic characteristics and were not explained by changing severity of the bipolar illness or functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Mental health treatment declined with age in this sample of youth with bipolar disorder, but reductions were not concentrated during or after the transition to age 18 years. Declines were unrelated to symptom severity or impairment.
2012
Hoeppner BB, Redding CA, Rossi JS, Pallonen UE, Prochaska JO, Velicer WF. Factor Structure of decisional balance and temptations scales for smoking: cross-validation in urban female African American adolescents. Int J Behav Med. 2012;19 (2) :217-227.Abstract

Background: The transtheoretical model is an influential theoretical model in health psychology, particularly in its application to smoking cessation research. Decisional Balance (DB) and Temptations are key constructs within this framework. Purpose: This study examines the psychometric properties of the DB and Temptations scales for smoking in a predominantly African-American sample of urban adolescent girls. Methods We used confirmatory factor analysis to compare the fit of previously published factor structures in smokers (n = 233) and nonsmokers (n=598). External validity was tested by examining stages of change differences in the retained subscales. Results: Results supported the internal and external validity of the DB scale for smokers and nonsmokers. Notably, previously published three-factor (Social Pros, Coping Pros, Cons) and four-factor (Cons split into “Aesthetic Cons” and “Health Cons”) models fit equally well, with Cons subscales correlating highly. For Temptations, a previously published three-factor (Negative Affect, Social, Weight Control) hierarchical model fit well in nonsmokers. In smokers, previously published subscales were reliably measured, but their structural relationship remained unclear. Stage difference tests showed medium to large effect sizes of DB and Temptation subscales in smokers and nonsmokers. Conclusions: The use of DB was validated for both smokers and nonsmokers in this sample of primarily African- American adolescent females, where Cons can be combined or separated into “Aesthetic Cons” and “Health Cons” based on practical utility and preference. For Temptations, more research is needed but large stage differences in Temptations subscales underscore the importance of this concept in smoking acquisition and cessation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Pachas GN, Cather C, Pratt SA. Varenincline for Smoking Cessation in Schizophrenia: Safety and Effectiveness in a 12-week, Open-Label Trial. Journal of Dual Diagnosis. 2012;8 (2) :117-125.Abstract

Objective: Varenicline was approved by the FDA in 2006. In 2009, based largely on case reports, the FDA issued a warning of possible adverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression and suicidal thoughts and behavior for varenicline and bupropion. Prospective trials of varenicline have not reported increased incidence of psychiatric adverse events other than sleep disturbance, but smokers with major mental illness have been excluded from large prospective trials of varenicline to date. We sought to evaluate the effect of a standard open-label 12-week varenicline trial on prospectively assessed safety and smoking outcomes in adults with stable, treated schizophrenia spectrum disorder and nicotine dependence. Methods: One-hundred twelve stable outpatients who smoked 10 or more cigarettes/day participated in a 12-week open-label smoking cessation trial of varenicline and weekly group cognitive behavioral therapy. Participants took varenicline for 4 weeks before attempting cessation. Trained raters collected safety and smoking outcome data weekly. Results: Participants demonstrated improved psychotic symptoms, depressive symptoms, and nicotine withdrawal symptoms from baseline to week 12 or early termination. At the end of 12 weeks’ open-label treatment, the 14- and 28-day continuous abstinence rates were 47.3% and 34%, respectively. Expired carbon monoxide declined significantly during treatment in those who did not achieve abstinence. Conclusions: This prospective study suggests that varenicline may be well tolerated and effective for smoking cessation in combination with group cognitive behavioral therapy in stable outpatients with schizophrenia, a group with high rates of smoking and smoking-attributable morbidity and mortality. This clinical trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as trial #NCT00621777. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)

Hoeppner BB, Barnett NP, Jackson KM, Colby SM, Kahler CW, Monti PM, Read J, Tevyaw T, Wood M, Corriveau D, et al. Daily college student drinking patterns across the first year of college. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2012;73 (4) :613-24.Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Despite the long recognized importance and well-documented impact of drinking patterns on health and safety, college student drinking patterns are understudied. This study used a daily-level, academic-year-long, multisite sample to identify subpopulations of college student drinking patterns and to describe how these groups differ from one another before, during, and after their first year of college. METHOD: Two cohorts of first-year college students (n = 588; 59% female) reported daily drinking on a biweekly basis using web-based surveys and completed surveys before and after their first year of college. RESULTS: Cluster analyses based on time series analysis estimates of within-person drinking differences (per weekday, semester, first 6 weeks) and other descriptors of day-to-day drinking identified five drinking patterns: two low (47% and 6%), two medium (24% and 15%), and one high (8%) drinking cluster. Multinomial logistic regression analyses examined cluster differences in pre-college characteristics (i.e., demographics, alcohol outcome expectancies, alcohol problems, depression, other substance use) and first-year college experiences (i.e., academic engagement, alcohol consequences, risky drinking practices, alcohol problems, drinking during academic breaks). Low-drinking students appeared to form a relatively homogeneous group, whereas two distinct patterns were found for medium-drinking students with different weekend and Thursday drinking rates. The Thursday drinking cluster showed lower academic engagement and greater participation in risky drinking practices. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight quantitative and qualitative differences in day-to-day drinking patterns and suggest a link between motivational differences and drinking patterns, which may be addressed in developing tailored interventional strategies.
Hoeppner BB, Redding CA, Rossi JS, Pallonen UE, Prochaska JO, Velicer WF. Factor structure of decisional balance and temptations scales for smoking: cross-validation in urban female African-American adolescents. Int J Behav Med. 2012;19 (2) :217-27.Abstract
BACKGROUND: The transtheoretical model is an influential theoretical model in health psychology, particularly in its application to smoking cessation research. Decisional Balance (DB) and Temptations are key constructs within this framework. PURPOSE: This study examines the psychometric properties of the DB and Temptations scales for smoking in a predominantly African-American sample of urban adolescent girls. METHODS: We used confirmatory factor analysis to compare the fit of previously published factor structures in smokers (n = 233) and nonsmokers (n = 598). External validity was tested by examining stages of change differences in the retained subscales. RESULTS: Results supported the internal and external validity of the DB scale for smokers and nonsmokers. Notably, previously published three-factor (Social Pros, Coping Pros, Cons) and four-factor (Cons split into "Aesthetic Cons" and "Health Cons") models fit equally well, with Cons subscales correlating highly. For Temptations, a previously published three-factor (Negative Affect, Social, Weight Control) hierarchical model fit well in nonsmokers. In smokers, previously published subscales were reliably measured, but their structural relationship remained unclear. Stage difference tests showed medium to large effect sizes of DB and Temptation subscales in smokers and nonsmokers. CONCLUSIONS: The use of DB was validated for both smokers and nonsmokers in this sample of primarily African-American adolescent females, where Cons can be combined or separated into "Aesthetic Cons" and "Health Cons" based on practical utility and preference. For Temptations, more research is needed but large stage differences in Temptations subscales underscore the importance of this concept in smoking acquisition and cessation.
Urbanoski KA, Kelly JF, Hoeppner BB, Slaymaker V. The role of therapeutic alliance in substance use disorder treatment for young adults. J Subst Abuse Treat. 2012;43 (3) :344-51.Abstract
The therapeutic alliance is deemed to be integral to psychotherapeutic interventions, yet little is known about the nature of its role in treatment for substance use disorders (SUD), especially among young people. We investigated baseline predictors of the therapeutic alliance measured midtreatment and tested whether the alliance influenced during-treatment changes in key process variables (psychological distress, motivation, self-efficacy, coping skills, and commitment to Alcoholics Anonymous/Narcotics Anonymous [AA/NA]) independent of these baseline influences. Young adults in residential treatment (N = 303; age 18-24 years) were assessed at intake, midtreatment, and discharge. Older age and higher baseline levels of motivation, self-efficacy, coping skills, and commitment to AA/NA predicted a stronger alliance. Independent of these influences, participants who developed a stronger alliance achieved greater reductions in distress during treatment. Findings clarify a role for alliance in promoting during-treatment changes through reducing distress.

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