Publications by Year: 2014

2014
B.G. Bergman and C. DeLucia. 2014. “ Clinical trainees' knowledge and beliefs about 12-step organizations: Implications for training and future practice.” Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 32, 4, Pp. 357-374. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Generalist mental health practitioners are likely to encounter patients with substance use disorders, indicating community-based, 12-Step mutual-help organizations (MHOs) can be a valuable referral source for these clinicians. Little is known, however, about how generalist practitioners and trainees understand these organizations. Results of a survey among 316 clinical trainees showed that knowledge levels were below a competency benchmark. While views were positive overall, empirically-inconsistent beliefs were also common. Beliefs and attitudes accounted for approximately one half of the variance in professional intentions (e.g., appropriate referral). The study highlighted knowledge gaps, though trainees appeared open to learning more about 12-Step MHOs. Thus systematic development and evaluation of clinical training in the area may be warranted.
B.G. Bergman, M. C. Greene, Hoeppner B.B., V. Slaymaker, and J. F. Kelly. 2014. “ Psychiatric comorbidity and 12-step participation: A longitudinal investigation of treated young adults.” Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research , 38, 2, Pp. 501-510. Publisher's VersionAbstract

BACKGROUND:

Evidence indicates that 12-step mutual-help organizations (MHOs), such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA), can play an important role in extending and potentiating the recovery benefits of professionally delivered addiction treatment among young adults with substance use disorders (SUD). However, concerns have lingered regarding the suitability of 12-step organizations for certain clinical subgroups, such as those with dual diagnosis (DD). This study examined the influence of diagnostic status (DD vs. SUD-only) on both attendance and active involvement (e.g., having a sponsor, verbal participation during meetings) in, and derived benefits from, 12-step MHOs following residential treatment.

METHODS:

Young adults (N = 296; 18 to 24 years old; 26% female; 95% Caucasian; 47% DD [based on structured diagnostic interview]), enrolled in a prospective naturalistic study of SUD treatment effectiveness, were assessed at intake and 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment on 12-step attendance/active involvement and percent days abstinent (PDA). t-Tests and lagged, hierarchical linear models (HLM) examined the extent to which diagnostic status influenced 12-step participation and any derived benefits, respectively.

RESULTS:

For DD and SUD-only patients, posttreatment attendance and active involvement in 12-step organizations were similarly high. Overall, DD patients had significantly lower PDA relative to SUD-only patients. All patients appeared to benefit significantly from attendance and active involvement on a combined 8-item index. Regarding the primary effects of interest, significant differences did not emerge in derived benefit between DD and SUD-only patients for either attendance (p = 0.436) or active involvement (p = 0.062). Subsidiary analyses showed, however, that DD patients experienced significantly greater abstinence-related benefit from having a 12-step sponsor.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite concerns regarding the clinical utility of 12-step MHOs for DD patients, findings indicate that DD young adults participate and benefit as much as SUD-only patients, and may benefit more from high levels of active involvement, particularly having a 12-step sponsor. Future work is needed to clarify how active 12-step involvement might offset the additional recovery burden of a comorbid mental illness on substance use outcomes.

Z. Schuman-Olivier, M. C. Greene, B.G. Bergman, and J. F. Kelly. 2014. “ Is residential treatment effective for opioid use disorders? A longitudinal comparison of treatment outcomes among opioid dependent, opioid misusing, and non-opioid using emerging adults with substance use disorder.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144, Pp. 178-185. Publisher's VersionAbstract

BACKGROUND:

Opioid misuse and dependence rates among emerging adults have increased substantially. While office-based opioid treatments (e.g., buprenorphine/naloxone) have shown overall efficacy, discontinuation rates among emerging adults are high. Abstinence-based residential treatment may serve as a viable alternative, but has seldom been investigated in this age group.

METHODS:

Emerging adults attending 12-step-oriented residential treatment (N=292; 18-24 years, 74% male, 95% White) were classified into opioid dependent (OD; 25%), opioid misuse (OM; 20%), and no opiate use (NO; 55%) groups. Paired t-tests and ANOVAs tested baseline differences and whether groups differed in their during-treatment response. Longitudinal multilevel models tested whether groups differed on substance use outcomes and treatment utilization during the year following the index treatment episode.

RESULTS:

Despite a more severe clinical profile at baseline among OD, all groups experienced similar during-treatment increases on therapeutic targets (e.g., abstinence self-efficacy), while OD showed a greater decline in psychiatric symptoms. During follow-up relative to OM, both NO and OD had significantly greater Percent Days Abstinent, and significantly less cannabis use. OD attended significantly more outpatient treatment sessions than OM or NO; 29% of OD was completely abstinent at 12-month follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings here suggest that residential treatment may be helpful for emerging adults with opioid dependence. This benefit may be less prominent, though, among non-dependent opioid misusers. Randomized trials are needed to compare more directly the relative benefits of outpatient agonist-based treatment to abstinence-based, residential care in this vulnerable age-group, and to examine the feasibility of an integrated model.

B.G. Bergman, M. C. Greene, V. Slaymaker, Hoeppner B.B., and J. F. Kelly. 2014. “ Young adults with co-occurring disorders: Substance use disorder treatment response and outcomes.” Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 46, 4, Pp. 420-428. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Compared to other life stages, young adulthood (ages 18-24) is characterized by qualitative differences including the highest rates of co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders (COD). Little is known, however, regarding young adults' response to substance use disorder (SUD) treatment, especially those with COD. Greater knowledge in this area could inform and enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of SUD care for this patient population. The current study investigated differences between 141 COD and 159 SUD-only young adults attending psychiatrically-integrated residential SUD treatment on intake characteristics, during-treatment changes on clinical targets (e.g., coping skills; abstinence self-efficacy), and outcomes during the year post-discharge. Contrary to expectations, despite more severe clinical profiles at intake, COD patients showed similar during-treatment improvements on clinical target variables, and comparable post-treatment abstinence rates and psychiatric symptoms. Clinicians referring young adults with COD to specialized care may wish to consider residential SUD treatment programs that integrate evidence-based psychiatric services.
J. F. Kelly, M. C. Greene, and B.G. Bergman. 2014. “Do drug-dependent patients attending Alcoholics Anonymous rather than Narcotics Anonymous do as well? A prospective, lagged, matching analysis.” Alcohol and Alcoholism, 49, 6, Pp. 645-653. Publisher's VersionAbstract

AIMS:

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the most prevalent 12-step mutual-help organization (MHO), yet debate has persisted clinically regarding whether patients whose primary substance is not alcohol should be referred to AA. Narcotics Anonymous (NA) was created as a more specific fit to enhance recovery from drug addiction; however, compared with AA, NA meetings are not as ubiquitous. Little is known about the effects of a mismatch between individuals' primary substance and MHOs, and whether any incongruence might result in a lower likelihood of continuation and benefit. More research would inform clinical recommendations.

METHOD:

Young adults (N = 279, M age 20.4, SD 1.6, 27% female; 95% White) in a treatment effectiveness study completed assessments at intake, and 3, 6, and 12 months post-treatment. A matching variable was created for 'primary drug' patients (i.e. those reporting cannabis, opiates or stimulants as primary substance; n = 198/279), reflecting the proportion of total 12-step meetings attended that were AA. Hierarchical linear models (HLMs) tested this variable's effects on future 12-step participation and percent days abstinent (PDA).

RESULTS:

The majority of meetings attended by both alcohol and drug patients was AA. Drug patients attending proportionately more AA than NA meetings (i.e. mismatched) were no different than those who were better matched to NA with respect to future 12-step participation or PDA.

CONCLUSION:

Drug patients may be at no greater risk of discontinuation or diminished recovery benefit from participation in AA relative to NA. Findings may boost clinical confidence in making AA referrals for drug patients when NA is less available.