Stroke treatment academic industry roundtable: research priorities in the assessment of neurothrombectomy devices

Citation:

Saver JL, Jovin TG, Smith WS, Albers GW, Baron J-C, Boltze J, Broderick JP, Davis LA, Demchuk AM, DeSena S, Fiehler J, Gorelick PB, Hacke W, Holt B, Jahan R, Jing H, Khatri P, Kidwell CS, Lees KR, Lev MH, Liebeskind DS, Luby M, Lyden P, Megerian TJ, Mocco J, Muir KW, Rowley HA, Ruedy RM, Savitz SI, Sipelis VJ, Shimp SK, Wechsler LR, Wintermark M, Wu O, Yavagal DR, Yoo AJ. Stroke treatment academic industry roundtable: research priorities in the assessment of neurothrombectomy devices. Stroke 2013;44(12):3596-601. Copy at https://j.mp/2Lm333V

Date Published:

2013 Dec

Abstract:

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The goal of the Stroke Treatment Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) meetings is to advance the development of stroke therapies. At STAIR VIII, consensus recommendations were developed for clinical trial strategies to demonstrate the benefit of endovascular reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke. SUMMARY OF REVIEW: Prospects for success with forthcoming endovascular trials are robust, because new neurothrombectomy devices have superior reperfusion efficacy compared with earlier-generation interventions. Specific recommendations are provided for trial designs in 3 populations: (1) patients undergoing intravenous fibrinolysis, (2) early patients ineligible for or having failed intravenous fibrinolysis, and (3) wake-up and other late-presenting patients. Among intravenous fibrinolysis-eligible patients, key principles are that CT or MRI confirmation of target arterial occlusions should precede randomization; endovascular intervention should be pursued with the greatest rapidity possible; and combined intravenous and neurothrombectomy therapy is more promising than neurothrombectomy alone. Among patients ineligible for or having failed intravenous fibrinolysis, scientific equipoise was affirmed and the need to randomize all eligible patients emphasized. Vessel imaging to confirm occlusion is mandatory, and infarct core and penumbral imaging is desirable in later time windows. Additional STAIR VIII recommendations include approaches to test multiple devices in a single trial, utility weighting of disability end points, and adaptive designs to delineate time and tissue injury thresholds at which benefits from intervention no longer accrue. CONCLUSIONS: Endovascular research priorities in acute ischemic stroke are to perform trials testing new, highly effective neuro thrombectomy devices rapidly deployed in patients confirmed to have target vessel occlusions.
Last updated on 11/27/2019