Publications

2006
Mexico City in the 21st Century: Facing the Social, Spatial, and Employment Challenges Ahead
Diane E. Davis. 2006. “Mexico City in the 21st Century: Facing the Social, Spatial, and Employment Challenges Ahead.” Urban Age Newsletter (LSE).
Review of Political Institutions by Joseph Colomer
Diane E. Davis. 2006. “Review of Political Institutions by Joseph Colomer.” Journal of Political and Military Sociology.
Review of The Mexico City Reader edited by Rubén Gallo
Diane E. Davis. 2006. “Review of The Mexico City Reader edited by Rubén Gallo.” Journal of Latin American Studies, 38, 3.
Scales of Conflict, Spaces of Contention
Diane E. Davis. 2006. “Scales of Conflict, Spaces of Contention.” Block # 03 (in English and Hebrew), special Issue on Y-UTOPIA.
Speaking to the Silences: Do We Need a Sociology for the Post-9-11 World?
Diane E. Davis. 2006. “Speaking to the Silences: Do We Need a Sociology for the Post-9-11 World?” International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society, 18, 3-4, Pp. 293-311. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Using a sociology of knowledge framing, this essay highlights how and why the sociological imagination presented by leading European and American scholars showcased in this special issue offers a relatively hopeful assessment of recent transformations. It then questions the extent to which the same optimism prevails for scholars, and citizens, of the poorer, less advanced countries of the world. It not only suggests that many of the fundamental sociological transformations associated with the contemporary era, ranging from globalization of economy, the rise of internet technology, the decline of the nation state, and the rise of more cosmopolitan identities, are unevenly distributed around the world. It also argues that their political social, and economic impact will vary, depending on history and developmental context. The essay further suggests that precisely because of the statist and protectionist legacies of late development, many of the same transformations that bring positive gains in the advanced capitalist world, signal troubles ahead for the developing world and its future. The essay draws to a close with a more focused examination of the dark side of recent transformations, evident in such problems as unchecked violence and regional or ethnic fragmentation across major swathes of the global south. Such developments, the essay concludes, should sustain the call for a more "pluralist" sociological imagination for the new millennium, one that can take into account differences within and between various countries around the globe, while also advancing our normative understanding of what it would take to make "global society" possible.
Undermining the Rule of Law: Democratization and the Dark Side of Police Reform in Mexico
Diane E. Davis. 2006. “Undermining the Rule of Law: Democratization and the Dark Side of Police Reform in Mexico.” Latin American Politics and Society, 48, 1, Pp. 55-86. Publisher's VersionAbstract
This article asks whether democratization, under certain historical conditions, may relate to the deteriorating rule of law. Focusing on Mexico City, where police corruption is significant, this study argues that the institutionalized legacies of police power inherited from Mexico's one-party system have severely constrained its newly democratic state's efforts to reform the police. Mexico's democratic transition has created an environment of partisan competition that, combined with decentralization of the state and fragmentation of its coercive and administrative apparatus, exacerbates intrastate and bureaucratic conflicts. These factors prevent the government from reforming the police sufficiently to guarantee public security and earn citizen trust, even as the same factors reduce capacity, legitimacy, and citizen confidence in both the police and the democratically elected state. This article suggests that when democracy serves to undermine rather than strengthen the rule of law, more democracy can actually diminish democracy and its quality.
2005
Cities in Global Context: A Brief Intellectual History
Diane E. Davis. 2005. “Cities in Global Context: A Brief Intellectual History.” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 29, 1, Pp. 92-109. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Studies of cities in global context have been around almost as long as scholars have been studying cities (Weber, 1927; Pirenne, 1936). Use of the concept ‘global city’ did not necessarily figure in the early writings on cities, but international market connections and trade linkages did. In many of these works, physical, social and economic changes in cities were tied to national and international political conditions — ranging from the demise of feudal or absolutist orders (Weber, 1958) to the rise of the modern nation‐state (Tilly, 1975; 1990) — as well as the appearance of the social relations of modernity (Durkheim, 1933; Simmel, 1950), which themselves were seen as materializing in cities and reinforcing capitalist development. Still, the concern with economic aspects of urbanization among those who studied cities had its own particular ‘geography’. In the United States, most early generations of urban scholars did not emphasize the economic dynamics of urban development to the same degree as did their counterparts in Europe, and they rarely examined cities in global context. This was particularly true during the 1940s and 1950s, when US sociologists became ethnocentrically focused on American urban problems relating to community and culture, neighborhood transformation, and social deviance or disorder. Yet it is precisely the fact that European and American urbanists initially approached the study of cities somewhat differently that helps explain the content, character and assumptions of subsequent research on global cities or cities in global context, both here and abroad.

Contending Planning Cultures and the Built Environment in Mexico City
Diane E. Davis. 2005. “Contending Planning Cultures and the Built Environment in Mexico City.” In Comparative Planning Cultures, edited by Bishwapriya Sanyal. New York: Routledge.
Globalization and Cities in Comparative Perspective
Diane E. Davis and Kian Tajbakhsh. 2005. “Globalization and Cities in Comparative Perspective.” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 29, 1, Pp. 89-91. Publisher's VersionAbstract
It is hard to miss the explosion of writings on cities and globalization. Almost every city function or metropolitan agglomeration and its fragments is now being conceptualized as ‘global’ in some way (Crane and Daniere, 1996; Keil, 1996; Al‐Sayyad, 2000; Taylor and Walker, 2001; Scott, 2002), while the character and composition of world ‘citiness’ is itself a common — albeit contested — subject of study (Knox, 1995; Hall, 1996; Taylor 2000a; 2000b; Douglas, 2001). With the growing popularity of the global city paradigm (Sassen, 1991; 1996), even the most conventional topics long studied by urbanists, ranging from suburbs (Muller, 1997) and ‘midtowns’ (Ford, 1998) to real estate (Haila, 1999; 2000), architecture (Krause and Petro, 2003; King, 2004) and urban governance (Brenner, 1999; Yusuf and Wu, 2000) are now routinely examined in global context. Globalization has even begun to dominate the vocabulary of urban policy‐making and politics, with scholarly articles devoted to the study of how cities market themselves in global terms (Duffy, 1995; Whitson and Macintosh, 1996) or how politicians symbolically use globalization in city electoral campaigns (Machimura, 1998). It seems we are all globalized now. The title of David Clark’s recent book, Urban World/Global City, merely takes this logic to its most extreme, collapsing global cities and an urban world into each other as linguistic shorthand for the modern condition.
In Search of the Public Sphere: Local, National, and International Influences in the Planning of Downtown Mexico City, 1910-1950
Diane E. Davis. 2005. “In Search of the Public Sphere: Local, National, and International Influences in the Planning of Downtown Mexico City, 1910-1950.” In From the Calpulin to the Zocalo: Essays on the History of the Public Sphere in Mexico, edited by Pablo Piccato and Cristina Sacristan. Mexico City: Instituto Mora.
Introduction: A Symposium on Globalization and Cities in Comparative Perspective
Diane E. Davis. 2005. “Introduction: A Symposium on Globalization and Cities in Comparative Perspective.” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 2, 1, Pp. 89-91.
Review of Wounded Cities: Destruction and reconstruction in a globalized world by Jane Schneider and Ida Susser (eds).
Diane E. Davis. 2005. “Review of Wounded Cities: Destruction and reconstruction in a globalized world by Jane Schneider and Ida Susser (eds).” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 29.
2004
Review of The Limits of Convergence: Globalization and Organizational Change in Argentina, South Korea, and Spain by Mauro Guillén
Diane E. Davis. 10/2004. “Review of The Limits of Convergence: Globalization and Organizational Change in Argentina, South Korea, and Spain by Mauro Guillén.” Economic Development and Cultural Change, 52, 1, Pp. 239-242. Publisher's Version
Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America
Diane E. Davis. 2004. Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Perhaps the most commonly held assumption in the field of development is that middle classes are the bounty of economic modernization and growth. As countries gradually transcend their agrarian past and become urbanized and industrialized, so the logic goes, middle classes emerge and gain in number, complexity, cultural influence, social prominence, and political authority. Yet this is only half the story. Middle classes shape industrial and economic development, they are not merely its product; the particular ways in which middle classes shape themselves—and the ways historical conditions shape them—influence development trajectories in multiple ways. This is the story of South Korea's and Taiwan's economic successes and Argentina's and Mexico's relative failures through an examination of their rural middle classes and disciplinary capacities. Can disciplining continue in a context where globalization squeezes middle classes and frees capitalists from the state and social contracts in which they have been embedded?
Historia de detectives: rastreando a la polícia de la capital en la historiografía política de México
Diane E. Davis. 2004. “Historia de detectives: rastreando a la polícia de la capital en la historiografía política de México.” In Los últimos cién años, Los próximo cién, edited by Sergio Tamayo Flores-Alatorre and Ariel Rodríguez Kuri, Pp. 69-94. Mexico City: Universidad Autónoma de México, Cultura Universitario/Serie Ensayo A.
Mexico City: The Challenge of Political Transition
Diane E. Davis and Arturo Alvarado. 2004. “Mexico City: The Challenge of Political Transition.” In Left in the City: Progressive and Participatory Local Governance in Latin America, edited by Benjamin Goldfrank and Daniel Chavez. London: Latin America Bureau.
Reverberations: Mexico City’s 1985 Earthquake and the Transformation of the Capital
Diane E. Davis. 2004. “Reverberations: Mexico City’s 1985 Earthquake and the Transformation of the Capital.” In The Resilient City, edited by Lawrence Vale and Tom Campanella. Oxford University Press.
The State of the State in Latin American Sociology
Diane E. Davis. 2004. “The State of the State in Latin American Sociology.” In Rethinking Development in Latin America, edited by Charles Wood and Bryan Roberts. Pennsylvania State Press University.
2003
Cities as Subjects: Some Methodological Reflections on Urban Approaches to National Development
Diane E. Davis. 2003. “Cities as Subjects: Some Methodological Reflections on Urban Approaches to National Development.” In Cómo mirar la ciudad: Perspectivas y métodos en la investigación urbana [English: How to See the City: Perspectives and Methods in Urban Investigation], edited by Ma. Teresa Esquivel Hernández, Ma. Concepción Huarte Trujillo, and Armando Cisneros Sosa. Mexico City: UAM-Atzcapotzalco.
Contemporary Challenges and Historical Reflections on the Study of Militaries, States, and Politics
Diane E. Davis. 2003. “Contemporary Challenges and Historical Reflections on the Study of Militaries, States, and Politics.” In Irregular Armed Forces and their Role in Politics and State Formation, edited by Diane E. Davis and Anthony W. Pereira, Pp. 5-34. New York and London: Cambridge University Press.

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