Does school policy affect housing choices? Evidence from the end of desegregation in Charlotte Mecklenburg

Citation:

D.D. Liebowitz and L.C. Page. 2014. “Does school policy affect housing choices? Evidence from the end of desegregation in Charlotte Mecklenburg.” American Education Research Journal, 51, 4, Pp. 671-703. Publisher's Version

Abstract:

We examine whether the legal decision to grant unitary status to the
Charlotte–Mecklenburg school district, which led to the end of race-conscious
student assignment policies, increased the probability that families with children
enrolled in the district would move to neighborhoods with a greater proportion
of student residents of the same race as their own children. Motivated
by the rich but inconclusive literature on the consequences of educational
and residential segregation, we make use of a natural policy experiment—a
judicial decision to end court-ordered busing—to estimate the causal
impacts of this policy shift on household residential decisions. We find
that, for those who moved, the legal decision made White families with children
in the Charlotte–Mecklenburg Schools substantially more likely than
they were during desegregation to move to a neighborhood with a greater
proportion of White residents than their own neighborhood.

Last updated on 07/03/2018