Publications

    M. Borsky, M. Cocude, D. D. Mehta, M. Zañartu, and J. Gudnason, “Classification of voice modes using neck-surface accelerometer data,” in International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, 2017.Abstract

     

    This study analyzes signals recorded using a neck-surface accelerometer from subjects producing speech with different voice modes. The purpose is to explore if the recorded waveforms can capture the glottal vibratory patterns which can be related to the movement of the vocal folds and thus voice quality. The accelerometer waveforms do not contain the supraglottal resonances, and these characteristics make the proposed method suitable for real-life voice quality assessment and monitoring as it does not breach patient privacy. The experiments with a Gaussian mexture model classifier demonstrate that different voice qualities produce distinctly different accelerometer waveforms. The system achieved 80.2% and 89.5% for frame- and utterance-level accuracy, respectively, for classifying among modal, breathy, pressed, and rough voice modes using a speaker-dependent classifier. Finally, the article presents characteristic waveforms for each modality and discusses their attributes.

     

    M. Borsky, D. D. Mehta, J. P. Gudjohnsen, and J. Gudnason, “Classification of voice modality using electroglottogram waveforms,” in INTERSPEECH, 2016.Abstract

     

    It has been proven that the improper function of the vocal folds can result in perceptually distorted speech that is typically identified with various speech pathologies or even some neurological diseases. As a consequence, researchers have focused on finding quantitative voice characteristics to objectively assess and automatically detect non-modal voice types. The bulk of the research has focused on classifying the speech modality by using the features extracted from the speech signal. This paper proposes a different approach that focuses on analyzing the signal characteristics of the electroglottogram (EGG) waveform. The core idea is that modal and different kinds of non-modal voice types produce EGG signals that have distinct spectral/cepstral characteristics. As a consequence, they can be distinguished from each other by using standard cepstral-based features and a simple multivariate Gaussian mixture model. The practical usability of this approach has been verified in the task of classifying among modal, breathy, rough, pressed and soft voice types. We have achieved 83% frame-level accuracy and 91% utterance-level accuracy by training a speaker-dependent system.