Changes in a Daily Phonotrauma Index after laryngeal surgery and voice therapy: Implications for the role of daily voice use in the etiology and pathophysiology of phonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction

Abstract:

Purpose This study attempts to gain insights into the role of daily voice use in the etiology and pathophysiology of phonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction (PVH) by applying a logistic regression-based daily phonotrauma index (DPI) to predict group-based improvements in patients with PVH after laryngeal surgery and/or postsurgical voice therapy. Method A custom-designed ambulatory voice monitor was used to collect 1 week of pre- and postsurgery data from 27 female patients with PVH; 13 of these patients were also monitored after postsurgical voice therapy. Normative weeklong data were obtained from 27 matched controls. Each week was represented by the DPI, standard deviation of the difference between the first and second harmonic amplitudes (H1-H2). Results Compared to pretreatment, the DPI significantly decreased in the patient group after surgery (Cohen's d effect size = -0.86) and voice therapy (d = -1.06). The patient group DPI only normalized after voice therapy. Conclusions The DPI produced the expected pattern of improved ambulatory voice use across laryngeal surgery and postsurgical voice therapy in a group of patients with PVH. The results were interpreted as providing new objective information about the role of daily voice use in the etiology and pathophysiology of PVH. The DPI is viewed as an estimate of potential vocal fold trauma that relies on combining the long-term distributional characteristics of two parameters representing the magnitude of phonatory forces (neck-surface acceleration magnitude) and vocal fold closure dynamics (H1-H2). Further validation of the DPI is needed to better understand its potential clinical use.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 11/01/2021