Effects of concurrent manual task performance on connected speech acoustics in individuals with Parkinson disease

Citation:

J. A. Whitfield, Z. Kriegel, A. M. Fullenkamp, and D. D. Mehta, “Effects of concurrent manual task performance on connected speech acoustics in individuals with Parkinson disease,” Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 62, no. 7, pp. 2099–2117, 2019.
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Abstract:

Purpose: Prior investigations suggest that simultaneous
performance of more than 1 motor-oriented task may
exacerbate speech motor deficits in individuals with
Parkinson disease (PD). The purpose of the current
investigation was to examine the extent to which
performing a low-demand manual task affected the
connected speech in individuals with and without PD.
Method: Individuals with PD and neurologically healthy
controls performed speech tasks (reading and
extemporaneous speech tasks) and an oscillatory
manual task (a counterclockwise circle-drawing
task) in isolation (single-task condition) and concurrently
(dual-task condition).
Results: Relative to speech task performance, no changes
in speech acoustics were observed for either group when
the low-demand motor task was performed with the
concurrent reading tasks. Speakers with PD exhibited
a significant decrease in pause duration between the
single-task (speech only) and dual-task conditions
for the extemporaneous speech task, whereas control
participants did not exhibit changes in any speech
production variable between the single- and dual-task
conditions.
Conclusions: Overall, there were little to no changes in
speech production when a low-demand oscillatory motor
task was performed with concurrent reading. For the
extemporaneous task, however, individuals with PD
exhibited significant changes when the speech and manual
tasks were performed concurrently, a pattern that was
not observed for control speakers.
Supplemental Material: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.
8637008

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 07/16/2019