Estimation of subglottal pressure from neck surface vibration in patients with voice disorders

Citation:

K. L. Marks, J. Z. Lin, J. A. Burns, T. A. Hron, R. E. Hillman, and D. D. Mehta, “Estimation of subglottal pressure from neck surface vibration in patients with voice disorders,” Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 63, no. 7, pp. 2202-2218, 2020.

Abstract:

Purpose

Given the established linear relationship between neck surface vibration magnitude and mean subglottal pressure (Ps) in vocally healthy speakers, the purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of the presence of a voice disorder on this baseline relationship.

Method

Data were obtained from participants with voice disorders representing a variety of glottal conditions, including phonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction, nonphonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction, and unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Participants were asked to repeat /p/-vowel syllable strings from loud-to-soft loudness levels in multiple vowel contexts (/pa/, /pi/, /pu/) and pitch levels (comfortable, higher than comfortable, lower than comfortable). Three statistical metrics were computed to analyze the regression line between neck surface accelerometer (ACC) signal magnitude and Ps within and across pitch, vowel, and voice disorder category: coefficient of determination (r2), slope, and intercept. Three linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the impact of voice disorder category, pitch level, and vowel context on the relationship between ACC signal magnitude and Ps.

Results

The relationship between ACC signal magnitude and Ps was statistically different in patients with voice disorders than in vocally healthy controls; patients exhibited higher levels of Ps given similar values of ACC signal magnitude. Negligible effects were found for pitch condition within each voice disorder category, and negligible-to-small effects were found for vowel context. The mean of patient-specific r2 values was .63, ranging from .13 to .92.

Conclusions

The baseline, linear relationship between ACC signal magnitude and Ps is affected by the presence of a voice disorder, with the relationship being participant-specific. Further work is needed to improve ACC-based prediction of Ps, across treatment, and during naturalistic speech production.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 11/01/2021