Reviews, Chapters, etc.

2019
D. D. Mehta and J. H. Van Stan, “Ambulatory phonation monitoring,” in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Human Communication Sciences and Disorders, J. S. Damico and M. Ball, Ed. 2019, pp. 90–91.
2017
T. F. Quatieri, et al., “Multimodal biomarkers to discriminate cognitive state,” in The Role of Technology in Clinical Neuropsychology, R. L. Kane and T. D. Parson, Ed. Oxford University Press, 2017, pp. 409–443.
J. H. Van Stan, D. D. Mehta, and R. E. Hillman, “Recent innovations in voice assessment expected to impact the clinical management of voice disorders,” Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, vol. 2, no. SIG 3, pp. 4-13, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This article provides a summary of some recent innovations in voice assessment expected to have an impact in the next 5–10 years on how patients with voice disorders are clinically managed by speech-language pathologists. Specific innovations discussed are in the areas of laryngeal imaging, ambulatory voice monitoring, and “big data” analysis using machine learning to produce new metrics for vocal health. Also discussed is the potential for using voice analysis to detect and monitor other health conditions.

Paper
2015
D. D. Mehta, D. D. Deliyski, S. M. Zeitels, M. Zañartu, and R. E. Hillman, “Integration of transnasal fiberoptic high-speed videoendoscopy with time-synchronized recordings of vocal function”, K. Izdebski, Y. Yan, R. R. Ward, B. J. F. Wong, and R. M. Cruz, Ed. San Francisco: Pacific Voice & Speech Foundation, 2015, pp. 105-114. Publisher's Version
2012
D. D. Mehta and R. E. Hillman, “Current role of stroboscopy in laryngeal imaging,” Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 429-436, 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent technological advancements and insight into the role of stroboscopy in laryngeal imaging. RECENT FINDINGS: Although stroboscopic technology has not undergone major technological improvements, recent clarifications have been made to the application of stroboscopic principles to video-based laryngeal imaging. Also recent advances in coupling stroboscopy with high-definition video cameras provide higher spatial resolution of vocal fold vibratory function during phonation. Studies indicate that the interrater reliability of visual stroboscopic assessment varies depending on the laryngeal feature being rated and that only a subset of features may be needed to be representative of an entire assessment. High-speed videoendoscopy (HSV) judgments have been shown to be more sensitive than stroboscopy for evaluating vocal fold phase asymmetry, pointing to the future potential of complementing stroboscopy with alternative imaging modalities in hybrid systems. Laryngeal videostroboscopy alone continues to play a central role in clinical voice assessment. Even though HSV may provide more detailed information about phonatory function, its eventual clinical adoption will depend on how remaining practical, technical, and methodological challenges will be met. SUMMARY: Laryngeal videostroboscopy continues to be the modality of choice for imaging vocal fold vibration, but technological advancements in HSV and associated research findings are driving increased interest in the clinical adoption of HSV to complement videostroboscopic assessment.

Paper
D. D. Mehta and R. E. Hillman, “The evolution of methods for imaging vocal fold phonatory function,” Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 5-13, 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In this article, we provide a brief summary of the major technological advances that led to current methods for imaging vocal fold vibration during phonation including the development of indirect laryngoscopy, imaging of rapid motion, fiber optics, and digital image capture. We also provide a brief overview of new emerging technologies that could be used in the future for voice research and clinical voice assessment, including advances in laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy, depth-kymography, and dynamic optical coherence tomography.

Paper
2011
R. E. Hillman and D. D. Mehta, “Ambulatory monitoring of daily voice use,” Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 56-61, 2011. Publisher's Version Paper
2010
R. E. Hillman and D. D. Mehta, “The science of stroboscopic imaging”, K. A. Kendall and R. J. Leonard, Ed. New York, NY: Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. 2010, pp. 101-109. Publisher's Version
2008
D. D. Mehta and R. E. Hillman, “Voice assessment: Updates on perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic, and endoscopic imaging methods,” Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 16, pp. 211-215, 2008. Publisher's VersionAbstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This paper describes recent advances in perceptual, acoustic, aerodynamic, and endoscopic imaging methods for assessing voice function. RECENT FINDINGS: We review advances from four major areas. PERCEPTUAL ASSESSMENT: Speech-language pathologists are being encouraged to use the new consensus auditory-perceptual evaluation of voice inventory for auditory-perceptual assessment of voice quality, and recent studies have provided new insights into listener reliability issues that have plagued subjective perceptual judgments of voice quality. ACOUSTIC ASSESSMENT: Progress is being made on the development of algorithms that are more robust for analyzing disordered voices, including the capability to extract voice quality-related measures from running speech segments. AERODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT: New devices for measuring phonation threshold air pressures and air flows have the potential to serve as sensitive indices of glottal phonatory conditions, and recent developments in aeroacoustic theory may provide new insights into laryngeal sound production mechanisms. ENDOSCOPIC IMAGING: The increased light sensitivity of new ultra high-speed color digital video processors is enabling high-quality endoscopic imaging of vocal fold tissue motion at unprecedented image capture rates, which promises to provide new insights into the mechanisms of normal and disordered voice production. SUMMARY: Some of the recent research advances in voice function assessment could be more readily adopted into clinical practice, whereas others will require further development.

Paper
2007
D. Mehta and R. E. Hillman, “Use of aerodynamic measures in clinical voice assessment,” Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, vol. 17, pp. 14-18, 2007. Paper