Publications by Year: 2012

2012
D. D. Mehta and R. E. Hillman, “Current role of stroboscopy in laryngeal imaging,” Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 429-436, 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent technological advancements and insight into the role of stroboscopy in laryngeal imaging. RECENT FINDINGS: Although stroboscopic technology has not undergone major technological improvements, recent clarifications have been made to the application of stroboscopic principles to video-based laryngeal imaging. Also recent advances in coupling stroboscopy with high-definition video cameras provide higher spatial resolution of vocal fold vibratory function during phonation. Studies indicate that the interrater reliability of visual stroboscopic assessment varies depending on the laryngeal feature being rated and that only a subset of features may be needed to be representative of an entire assessment. High-speed videoendoscopy (HSV) judgments have been shown to be more sensitive than stroboscopy for evaluating vocal fold phase asymmetry, pointing to the future potential of complementing stroboscopy with alternative imaging modalities in hybrid systems. Laryngeal videostroboscopy alone continues to play a central role in clinical voice assessment. Even though HSV may provide more detailed information about phonatory function, its eventual clinical adoption will depend on how remaining practical, technical, and methodological challenges will be met. SUMMARY: Laryngeal videostroboscopy continues to be the modality of choice for imaging vocal fold vibration, but technological advancements in HSV and associated research findings are driving increased interest in the clinical adoption of HSV to complement videostroboscopic assessment.

Paper
M. Ghassemi, et al., “Detecting voice modes for vocal hyperfunction prevention,” Proceedings of the 7th Annual Workshop for Women in Machine Learning. 2012.
D. D. Mehta, et al., “Duration of ambulatory monitoring needed to accurately estimate voice use,” Proceedings of InterSpeech: Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, 2012. Paper Poster
D. D. Mehta and R. E. Hillman, “The evolution of methods for imaging vocal fold phonatory function,” Perspectives on Speech Science and Orofacial Disorders, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 5-13, 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In this article, we provide a brief summary of the major technological advances that led to current methods for imaging vocal fold vibration during phonation including the development of indirect laryngoscopy, imaging of rapid motion, fiber optics, and digital image capture. We also provide a brief overview of new emerging technologies that could be used in the future for voice research and clinical voice assessment, including advances in laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy, depth-kymography, and dynamic optical coherence tomography.

Paper
D. D. Mehta, S. M. Zeitels, J. A. Burns, A. D. Friedman, D. D. Deliyski, and R. E. Hillman, “High-speed videoendoscopic analysis of relationships between cepstral-based acoustic measures and voice production mechanisms in patients undergoing phonomicrosurgery,” Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, vol. 121, pp. 341-347, 2012. Paper
D. D. Mehta, D. Rudoy, and P. J. Wolfe, “Kalman-based autoregressive moving average modeling and inference for formant and antiformant tracking,” The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 132, no. 3, pp. 1732-1746, 2012. Publisher's Version Paper code
D. D. Mehta, M. Zañartu, S. W. Feng, H. A. Cheyne II, and R. E. Hillman, “Mobile voice health monitoring using a wearable accelerometer sensor and a smartphone platform,” IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, vol. 59, no. 11, pp. 3090-3096, 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Many common voice disorders are chronic or recurring conditions that are likely to result from faulty and/or abusive patterns of vocal behavior, referred to generically as vocal hyperfunction. An ongoing goal in clinical voice assessment is the development and use of noninvasively derived measures to quantify and track the daily status of vocal hyperfunction so that the diagnosis and treatment of such behaviorally based voice disorders can be improved. This paper reports on the development of a new, versatile, and cost-effective clinical tool for mobile voice monitoring that acquires the high-bandwidth signal from an accelerometer sensor placed on the neck skin above the collarbone. Using a smartphone as the data acquisition platform, the prototype device provides a user-friendly interface for voice use monitoring, daily sensor calibration, and periodic alert capabilities. Pilot data are reported from three vocally normal speakers and three subjects with voice disorders to demonstrate the potential of the device to yield standard measures of fundamental frequency and sound pressure level and model-based glottal airflow properties. The smartphone-based platform enables future clinical studies for the identification of the best set of measures for differentiating between normal and hyperfunctional patterns of voice use.

Paper