Biography

My passion for marine biology stems from an early fascination with all things oceanic.  In the beginning it was directed at sharks but my imagination was also captured by the beauty and awe of deep-sea hydrothermal vents.  Today, I am still is captivated by this alien deep-sea world and is intrigued by the interactions between the microorganism and geological and chemical environment.

 

Above. "Captain" Rogers onboard the SSV Corwith Cramer of the Sea Education Association.

I received my B.S. and M.S. at the University of Connecticut, working with Dr. Pieter Visscher. This work focused on the role of sulfate reducing and sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the formation of lithified calcium carbonate layers in modern marine stromatolites. After a stint as a Research Associate at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, I continued my training, resulting in a Ph.D. from the MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Chemical Oceanography. My dissertation fieldwork focused on probing the nitrogen cycle of a coastal groundwater by utilizing a novel combination of molecular microbial ecology and natural abundance stable isotope geochemistry. I am currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in Dr. Peter Girguis' lab at Harvard University where I am applying my molecular and isotopic toolbox to examine the linkages between the carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycles at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

Above. Exiting the HOV Alvin after a successful mission encompassing about 8hr. in the the tight confines of the 6 ft. diameter personel sphere of the sub.

Below. Moments Later, the traditional coldwater dousing that follows your first Alvin dive. Here I am drenched by (waiting anxiously left to right) Wolfgang Bach, Olivier Rouxel, Cara Santelli and (caught in the moment) Peter Canovas. It is an Alvin tradition to assail people after their first dive. This often entails cold water and maybe even wet or frozen belongings. This after 7 to 8 hrs without a bathroom break and the exhaustion of many more late-night hours of work ahead of you processing all the samples collected on the dive.