Presentations

“Talking to the Moon”: Osage Technoscientific Landscapes and Relations Management, 1906-1945, at American Studies Association, Atlanta, GA, Thursday, November 8, 2018

The early 1920s saw a crisis on Osage lands in Oklahoma when what was described as a “reign of terror” orchestrated by oil-greedy settlers resulted in the deaths of approximately 60 Osage citizens over the span of four years. Described by the New York Times in 1926 as the “most determined combination of craft and violence [ever seen] in the white race,” the reign of terror involved white settlers making family connections with Osage citizens through marriage, adoption, and legal maneuvering only to murder their new...

Read more about “Talking to the Moon”: Osage Technoscientific Landscapes and Relations Management, 1906-1945
Anthropology and the Indigenous Queer, at Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Los Angeles, CA, Thursday, May 17, 2018

In 1992, editors of Ethnographic Studies of Homosexuality, declared, “Time is running out; when the last tribal Pauan can tune in to the ‘Gay Liberation Hour’ with his satellite dish, traditional field work will be at an end” (xv). On the heels of founding the first gay and lesbian studies department in 1986, LGBT anthropologists in the U.S. reformulated a salvage ethic geared toward documenting the practices of “non-homophobic” Indigenous cultures. Drawing on published works and archival materials of...

Read more about Anthropology and the Indigenous Queer
“To share in the spirit of the olden life upon this continent”: Keeping Time in Da-O-Ma, at Priors and Priorities: Conceiving Time and Other Bodies Graduate Conference, Harvard University , Saturday, April 21, 2018
The artists and scientists who contributed to the Indianist Music Movement in the United States at the turn of the 20th century bemoaned that the youth of their settler state had “not permitted any sudden outburst of folk-song that would embody the defeats, the victories, the achievements of our national life” (Cadman 1915, 387). To supplement this settler cultural impediment, composers, ethnologists, poets and performers looked to Indigenous music traditions as an inspiration for and source of uniquely “American” musical... Read more about “To share in the spirit of the olden life upon this continent”: Keeping Time in Da-O-Ma
“Hokule’a is in the past:” Spacefaring Canoes and Indigenous Seafaring in Science Fiction and Future Imaginaries , at Society for Social Studies of Science Annual Conference: Boston, MA., Friday, September 1, 2017

In 1992, the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the University of Hawai’i organized a conversation for university students and Hokule’a with the crew of the space shuttle Columbia, then in orbit. A student asked Lacy Veach, pilot of the space shuttle, about the differences and similarities between canoes and space travel. Veach responded, “Both are voyages of exploration. Hokule’a is in the past. Columbia is in the future.” And yet, the canoe has been taken up as a technology of future travel by both science fiction (SF) producers and scientists. In this...

Read more about “Hokule’a is in the past:” Spacefaring Canoes and Indigenous Seafaring in Science Fiction and Future Imaginaries
Walking to the Future in the Steps of our Ancestors: Haudenosaunee Temporality and Epistemic Sovereignty in the Age of Climate Change ​, at History of Science Society Conference, Saturday, November 5, 2016

Agenda 21, Chapter 26 of the 1991 Rio Earth Summit proceedings recognized the “holistic traditional scientific knowledge” possessed by indigenous peoples and their unique vulnerability to environmental degradation and climate change. The Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) sent a delegation to the conference to read the “Thanksgiving Address” and air their environmental issues to an international audience. In 1992 Onondogan Faith Keeper Oren Lyons established the Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force (HETF), andthree years...

Read more about Walking to the Future in the Steps of our Ancestors: Haudenosaunee Temporality and Epistemic Sovereignty in the Age of Climate Change ​
"Sacred Lives Under Glass: False Face Society Medicine Masks, Postcolonial Anthropology, and Haudenosaunee Politics of Refusal in the Twentieth Century", at Ways Of Knowing Conference, Harvard Divinity School, Saturday, October 29, 2016

Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) False Face medicine masks are living representations of the oldest medicine beings. Carved from still living trees by False Face Medicine Society members for their own exclusive use in ritual, False Face masks breathe and sense, and they are integral to the spiritual health and safety of the communities they protect. As such, their display, including images and reproductions, is regarded as dangerous and sacrilegious by Haudenosaunee leaders. This sacred and private status was officially announced by Chief Leon Shenandoah, the Haudenosaunee Grand Council...

Read more about "Sacred Lives Under Glass: False Face Society Medicine Masks, Postcolonial Anthropology, and Haudenosaunee Politics of Refusal in the Twentieth Century"
"Navigating the St. Lawrence Seaway in a Canoe: Haudenosaunee Science, Sovereignty and Environmental Activism", at Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Conference, Thursday, May 19, 2016

Ecological and public health crises, one often the consequence of the other, have resulted in deep historical trauma and change in Indian Country. They have taken the form of population devastating epidemics, supposed soil conservation emergencies, and critical species extinction or near extinction, among many others. Most recently we’ve been struck by the “suicide epidemic,” framed by news outlets and public health officials as the “Indian youth crisis”. These crises change in time and place and have had different meanings to the nations and people who have managed and survived them. But...

Read more about "Navigating the St. Lawrence Seaway in a Canoe: Haudenosaunee Science, Sovereignty and Environmental Activism"