Conferences and Workshops

Conference Papers & Presentations

Integrating IIIF and Mirador at Harvard
Steward, J., Singhal, R., Stern, R., Emanuel, J. P., & Harward, J. V. (2017). Integrating IIIF and Mirador at Harvard. In Visual Resources Association (VRA) 34th Annual Conference: Unbridled Opportunities . Louisville, KY, March 9-April 1.
One Framework to Rule Them All: The Unifying Impact of IIIF on Teaching, Research, Museums, and Libraries at Harvard
Emanuel, J. P., Barrett, A., Steward, J., & Stern, R. (2017). One Framework to Rule Them All: The Unifying Impact of IIIF on Teaching, Research, Museums, and Libraries at Harvard. In New Media Consortium (NMC) Summer Conference 2017 . Boston, MA, June 12-15. Click Here to DownloadAbstract
The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) is a set of common APIs developed to provide access to digital visual material from libraries, museums, and other repositories without the all-too-frequent need for a common viewing application. In this session, discover how Harvard has leveraged the promise of IIIF across multiple functional areas, supporting the adoption of a new Harvard Library Viewer, walls of images in the Harvard Art Museums, and image collections embedded in Canvas and in MOOCs from HarvardX — all in high resolution and with unprecedented interactivity.
Digital Visual Material: Community–Based Interoperability and Interactivity in High Definition
Emanuel, J. P. (2016). Digital Visual Material: Community–Based Interoperability and Interactivity in High Definition. In 2nd International Conference on Art & Archaeology 2016: Art and Archaeology Strengthened by Measurement Techniques . Jerusalem, Israel.Abstract

The rate at which images and objects are being digitized has increased significantly over the last quarter century, while technological developments have improved both quality of and storage of digital material. This, by extension, increases the potential for deeper interaction with digital visual material by the end user, be they a scholar, student, or layperson. However, efforts to share content across institutions (and, in some cases, across repositories within an institution) continue to encounter obstacles. The open source International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) was conceived to address this barrier to the access and sharing of content by developing a community-based protocol for standardized image retrieval that will collaboratively produce both interoperable technology and a common framework for image delivery, without requiring the adoption of any specific software. This paper will lay out the principles and partnership behind IIIF, its application to the wider field of art and archaeology, and a road map for the near-term future, which includes current work on a digital "scholars’ workbench” that will allow users to take full advantage of IIIF, while affording them the ability to collect, store, share, annotate, and arrange high-resolution digital images from multiple repositories worldwide. Also included in this paper will be an overview of one high–resolution, open source, IIIF-compliant image viewer, a JavaScript application called Mirador.

Warfare or Piracy? Describing and defining naval combat in the Late Bronze-Early Iron Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean
Emanuel, J. P. (2016). Warfare or Piracy? Describing and defining naval combat in the Late Bronze-Early Iron Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean. In The Aegean and the Levant at the Turn of the Bronze Age and early Iron Age . University of Warsaw. Click Here to DownloadAbstract

Literary and iconographic accounts suggest that the transition from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age (LH IIIB-LH IIIC) in the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean was marked by increased threats on both land and sea. This includes the iconography of warriors and warfare, particularly in Egypt and in the Aegean world, where the first representations of true ship-to-ship combat are seen. This paper investigates these early iconographic and literary accounts, asking whether they should be seen as “warfare” in the formal sense, as piratical (and anti-piratical) naval operations, or as a combination of both, and seeking to define these terms in the context of the Late Bronze-Early Iron Age transition. Adaptations in ship technology and fighting style that had to be made by states and non-state actors alike during this turbulent time are also considered.

IIIF as an Enabler to Interoperability within a Single Institution
Stern, R., Emanuel, J. P., Harward, V. J., Singhal, R., & Steward, J. (2016). IIIF as an Enabler to Interoperability within a Single Institution. In Access to the World’s Images: The 2016 International Image Interoperability Conference . New York, NY. Click Here to DownloadAbstract

Harvard has been able to leverage the promise of interoperable APIs by replicating the IIIF/Mirador design pattern across multiple functional areas sharing core Image API and digital repository services. Sharing knowledge, expertise, and digital content, and Mirador, multiple “heads” have sprouted: a viewer application for the HarvardX course “The Book”, a new Harvard Library Viewer, faculty image collections that can be created and curated in course websites via LTI, and walls of images in the Harvard Art Museums. What did it take to enable this level of collaboration in a large distributed organization?

From Access to Interaction: Leveraging Digital Repositories to Advance Teaching, Learning, and Research
Emanuel, J. P. (2015). From Access to Interaction: Leveraging Digital Repositories to Advance Teaching, Learning, and Research. In Digitorium Digital Humanities Conference.Abstract

How can digital archives be made more open and accessible, both within and across institutions? Can new ways of accessing digitized objects truly improve the ways these objects and their physical counterparts are used in teaching, learning, and research? And how has the new emphasis on open online learning driven the way these questions are approached? This paper provides a case study in the use of digital material in scholarship and pedagogy, with particular focus on Mirador, an open-source (https://github.com/IIIF/mirador), scalable, high-resolution tool with annotation capability that makes use of an open API standard (specifically the International Image Interoperability Framework, or IIIF) to support simultaneous interaction with digitized objects from multiple repositories worldwide. Beyond being developed as a next-generation tool for interaction with digitized library and museum objects, Mirador also serves a key role in Humanities instruction online, with its first public release coming in 2015 in the service of an interdisciplinary Massive Open Online Course focusing on the history of the Book (HUM 1x, offered via edX). This presentation will include a demonstration of Mirador, with particular emphasis on its role in fostering intimate, user-directed interaction with digitized objects in museums, libraries, and other repositories, both as a research tool and as an interoperable (LTI) resource for teaching and learning in the online environment.

Conferences and Conference Sessions Organized & Chaired

First Annual Boston-Area Digital Scholarship Symposium
Singhal, R., Schreiner, M., Crawford, C., & Emanuel, J. P. (2019). First Annual Boston-Area Digital Scholarship Symposium. [Organizer] . Cambridge, MA. Click Here for More Information About the SymposiumAbstract
The First Annual Boston Area Digital Scholarship Symposium brings together scholars from the greater Boston area to share their work in digital scholarship in the form of talks, panel discussions, and poster presentations. The focus of the 2019 symposium is "Institutional Models of Collaborative Support."
Digital Tools and Techniques for Teaching Archaeology
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Digital Tools and Techniques for Teaching Archaeology. [Session Organizer and Chair] . 'Human History and Digital Future,' the 46th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2018), University of Tübingen, Germany, March 19-23.Abstract

The goal of this session is to convene practitioners in a dialogue that is focused on examples of digitally-informed approaches to archaeological instruction in any setting. This can include field schools, workshops, seminars, massive open online courses (MOOCs), and more. Contributions to this session can consist of successful approaches to integrating digital methods into the instruction of archaeology and cultural heritage, either in the classroom, online, or via hybrid methods, as well as lessons learned from approaches that were not as successful as desired.

This session is partly planned as a follow-up to the CAA 2017 session Archaeology In and Out of the Classroom." We envision it as being interactive in nature: paper presentations may be supplemented by demonstrations of digital tools and approaches, and projects that are in the planning or pilot stage, or that are in need of reworking to improve results, can be discussed or workshopped by session participants. The ultimate goals for presenters and attendees alike are to gain better understanding of pedagogical approaches to archaeology, to leave better equipped to intelligently apply digital methods and tools to teaching, and to have made contacts within a community of practice to whom they can go with future ideas, questions, and challenges.

Immersive Techniques in Archaeological Practice and Publication
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Immersive Techniques in Archaeological Practice and Publication. [Session Organizer and Chair] . 'Human History and Digital Future,' the 46th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2018), University of Tübingen, Germany, March 19–23.Abstract

This session focuses on the thoughtful integration of digital methods into the processes of gathering, recording, interrogating, and publishing archaeological data. Digital publications, geospatial datasets, and three-dimensional presentation are examples of interactive approaches to what has been called “digital archaeology.” This interactivity can be taken a step further, as approaches like Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality (AR, VR, and MR) allow for the fostering of immersive experiences around the reconstruction, visualization, and presentation of archaeological data.

This session highlights all aspects of digital innovation in the survey, excavation, interrogation, and publication process, with particular emphasis on 3D modeling and printing, data interoperability, and VR, AR, and MR. It is intended both to serve as a follow-up to the CAA 2017 session on 3D modeling, AR/VR, and immersion (chaired by the session proposer), and to foster further discussion about the uses of interactive and immersive technologies both in the field, and in the presentation and analysis of objects and datasets.

The format of this session will be a combination of interactive presentation and discussion, with a specific emphasis on demonstrations of 3D reconstruction, Virtual/Augmented and Mixed Reality experiences, online presentation, and other interactive and immersive approaches to excavation, recording, and dissemination. Our goal is to cultivate a needed community of practice and shared knowledge around these techniques and approaches, while working together to support the highest quality of digital methods and processes in archaeological practice.

From Physical to Digital, from Interactive to Immersive: Uses of Three-Dimensional Representation, Mixed Reality, and More in the Sharing and Exploration of Archaeological Data
Emanuel, J. P. (2017). From Physical to Digital, from Interactive to Immersive: Uses of Three-Dimensional Representation, Mixed Reality, and More in the Sharing and Exploration of Archaeological Data. [Session Organizer and Chair] . 'Digital Archaeologies, Material Worlds (Past and Present),' the 45th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2017), Georgia State University, March 14-16.Abstract

Innovations in digital recording have caused the amount of data collected during modern archaeological excavations to dwarf that collected only a few years ago – let alone in the excavations of the previous century. The thoughtful integration of digital methods into the process (from excavation to publication) can assist in more complete recording and, just as importantly, meaningful presentation and dissemination of these data. The integration into the digital picture of data from prior excavations and campaign seasons, which may have been recorded in different formats and following different methodologies, is also important.

Digital publications, geospatial datasets, and 3D printed objects are examples of interactive approaches to this problem. This is can be taken a step further with immersion, as modern approaches like Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality allow us to create truly immersive experiences around the reconstruction, visualization, and presentation of data.

In archaeology, interaction and immersion can serve at least two purposes: (1) exhibition and display, which can include the digital supplements to publications and exhibits, physical reconstruction and replication, and virtual reconstruction of sites and artifacts, including those that no longer physically exist; and (2) the close examination of live datasets, which can run the gamut from database queries to the 3D rendering of archaeological data in situ for the purpose of discovery, analysis, and information sharing. Archaeological data in particular are well–suited to Augmented and Virtual Reality for both presentation and dataset exploration, as GIS points and associated finds, which are inherently three–dimensional, connote possible shapes, models, and textures.

This session is intended to foster discussion about the uses of interactive and immersive technologies both in the field, and in the presentation and analysis of objects and datasets. Its format will be a combination of interactive presentation and discussion, with a specific emphasis on demonstrations of 3D reconstruction, Virtual/Augmented and Mixed Reality experiences, online presentation, and other interactive and immersive approaches to excavation, recording, and dissemination. Our goal is to cultivate the community of practice and shared knowledge around these techniques and approaches, while working together to support the highest quality of research and dissemination of archaeological data in this digital age.

Archaeology In and Out of the Classroom: Digital Approaches to Archaeological Instruction
Emanuel, J. P. (2017). Archaeology In and Out of the Classroom: Digital Approaches to Archaeological Instruction. [Session Organizer and Chair] . 'Digital Archaeologies, Material Worlds (Past and Present),' the 45th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2017), Georgia State University, March 14-16.Abstract

The continuous development and adoption digital methods, tools, and technologies is having an impact on virtually every field. In archaeology, these developments affect the way we carry out excavations, conservation, publication, and all of the steps in between. Similarly, technology has become such an ingrained part of teaching and learning that what used to be referred to separately as “teaching with technology” has now simply become a part of teaching writ large.

The convergence between technologically-informed teaching and the practice of archaeology takes place on multiple levels, from introductory instruction to higher-order skills needed for fieldwork and data analysis. Similarly, it is realized through multiple modalities, including in person – in the field and in the classroom – and online, as well as in a hybrid form consisting of classroom/field and classroom/online combinations.

The goal of this session is to convene practitioners in a dialogue that is focused on examples of digitally-informed approaches to archaeological instruction in any setting, from seminars to massive open online courses (MOOCs) to field workshops, etc. To that end, we invite contributions that speak to the application of digital methods to the teaching of archaeology as a subject and as a practice. These contributions can consist of successful approaches to integrating digital methods into the instruction of archaeology and cultural heritage, either in the classroom, online, or via hybrid methods, as well as lessons learned from less successful approaches.

We envision this as an interactive session: paper presentations may be supplemented by demonstrations of digital tools and approaches, and projects that are in the planning or pilot stage, or that are in need of reworking to improve results, can be discussed or ‘workshopped’ by session participants, with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding of, and becoming better equipped to intelligently apply, digital methods and tools to the teaching of archaeology.

Art, Artefacts, and Archaeology
Emanuel, J. P. (2013). Art, Artefacts, and Archaeology. [Session Chair] . International Ancient Warfare Conference 2013, National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth.