Publications by Year: 2018

2018
Donald B. Redford, The Medinet Habu Records of the Foreign Wars of Ramesses III
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Donald B. Redford, The Medinet Habu Records of the Foreign Wars of Ramesses III. Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections , 20, 75-78.Abstract

Publisher's description:

The Medinet Habu Records of the Foreign Wars of Ramesses III is a new translation and commentary of the Textual record of Ramesses III’s military activity. As such it dwells heavily upon the inscriptions dealing with Libyans and Sea Peoples. Since the format is oral formulaic, the texts are scanned and rendered as lyric. The new insights into the period covered by the inscriptions leads to a new appraisal of the identity of Egypt’s enemies, as well as events surrounding the activity of the Sea Peoples. The exercise is not intended to dismiss, but rather to complement the archaeological evidence.

Differentiating Naval Warfare and Piracy in the Late Bronze–Early Iron Age Mediterranean: Possibility or Pipe Dream?
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Differentiating Naval Warfare and Piracy in the Late Bronze–Early Iron Age Mediterranean: Possibility or Pipe Dream? In Change, Continuity, and Connectivity: North-Eastern Mediterranean at the Turn of the Bronze Age and in the Early Iron Age (ed. L. Niesiolowski-Spano & M. Węcowski). Contributions to the Study of Ancient World Cultures 118. . Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag,. Click Here to DownloadAbstract
The difference between warfare and piracy, particularly when it comes to naval conflict in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Eastern Mediterranean, has been in need of theoretical attention for some time. While both terms are frequently used, the acts themselves remain imprecisely delineated. This paper endeavors to begin the process of exploring to just what degree that is possible.
Building Sustainable Digital Scholarship Support at Harvard
Pizzorno, G., Schreiner, M., Emanuel, J. P., Bentley, B., Barthelmy, W. F., Crawford, C., Guillette, J., et al. (2018). Building Sustainable Digital Scholarship Support at Harvard . Harvard University Library S.T. Lee Innovation Grant, $19,950 (Co-Investigator).Abstract

This grant supports on a series of initiatives designed to improve support for Digital Scholarship at Harvard, by providing opportunities for students, faculty, and staff to acquire digital skills and support their efforts to apply them in research and curricular contexts. In particular, it supports the expansion of the Library’s role in Digital Scholarship through the development of a sustainable, scalable training program in digital methods for its staff. This expansion aligns with the Harvard Library objectives for delivering innovative and programmatic support for Research, Teaching and Learning in delivering innovative and programmatic support for learning and research in partnership with faculty and other research and pedagogical support organizations.

Hedera: A Personalized Vocabulary Database and Readability Gauge
Schiefsky, M., Livingston, I., Brown, R. M., Emanuel, J. P., & Barthelmy, W. F. (2018). Hedera: A Personalized Vocabulary Database and Readability Gauge . Harvard University Foreign Language Advisory Group (FLAG) Development Grant, $2,500 (Co-Investigator).Abstract
Hedera facilitates the application of second language acquisition research to teaching and learning by enabling users to maintain custom lists of known vocabulary and analyzing texts to see what percentage of words the user knows. A prototype of Hedera is being developed for Latin in order to create readable texts for beginning Latin students and to facilitate Latin teachers' selection of passages for reading and assessment.
Hedera: A Personalized Vocabulary Database and Readability Gauge
Schiefsky, M., Livingston, I., Brown, R. M., Emanuel, J. P., & Barthelmy, W. F. (2018). Hedera: A Personalized Vocabulary Database and Readability Gauge . Harvard University Barajas Dean’s Innovation Fund for Digital Arts and Humanities, $12,000 (Co-Investigator).Abstract
Hedera facilitates the application of second language acquisition research to teaching and learning by enabling users to maintain custom lists of known vocabulary and analyzing texts to see what percentage of words the user knows. A prototype of Hedera is being developed for Latin in order to create readable texts for beginning Latin students and to facilitate Latin teachers' selection of passages for reading and assessment.
Stitching Together Technology for the Digital Humanities with the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF)
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Stitching Together Technology for the Digital Humanities with the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF). In K. Joranson & R. Kear (Ed.), Digital Humanities, Libraries, and Partnerships (Vol. 1, pp. 125–135) . Oxford: Chandos Elsevier. Click Here to DownloadAbstract

The International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) is a set of common APIs developed to provide access to digital visual material from libraries, museums, and other repositories without the all-too-frequent need for a common viewing application. By using a common framework to collaborate across institutional silos, Harvard has leveraged the promise of IIIF in multiple functional areas, supporting the adoption of a new Harvard Library Viewer, walls of images in the Harvard Art Museums, and image collections embedded in Canvas and in massive open online courses from HarvardX—all in high resolution, and with unprecedented interactivity.

Harvard Yard Archaeology Project
Capone, P., Loren, D., Emanuel, J. P., & Wolf, A. (2018). Harvard Yard Archaeology Project . Harvard University Information Technology/Faculty of Arts and Sciences (HUIT/FAS) Project Review Board Grant, $25,000 (Co-Investigator).Abstract
For over a decade, sections of Harvard Yard have been opened up every other fall so that students in the College can study the history that lies beneath their feet. The excavation is part of the Archaeology of Harvard Yard (ANTH 1130 and 1131), a two-semester course offered biennially by the Department of Anthropology and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

The Peabody Museum has displayed artifacts from this excavation in its “Digging Veritas” exhibit since 2008, and a recent partnership between Academic Technology for FAS (AT-FAS) and the Peabody is bringing the dig to life in a new, technologically-advanced way, using an online exhibition tool (Omeka) and an augmented reality (AR) application that allows users both to view 3D reconstructions of the trenches, and to access student-authored "object biographies" of key finds from the excavation.

More information is available at the following links:

 

Hedera: A Personalized Vocabulary Database and Readability Gauge
Schiefsky, M., Livingston, I., Brown, R. M., Emanuel, J. P., & Barthelmy, W. F. (2018). Hedera: A Personalized Vocabulary Database and Readability Gauge . Harvard Initiative in Learning and Teaching (HILT) Targeted Support Grant, $65,332 (Co–Investigator).Abstract

Awardees will incorporate more languages and enhanced features into Hedera, a web application that supports research-based language pedagogy.

Hedera facilitates the application of second language acquisition research to teaching and learning by enabling users to maintain custom lists of known vocabulary and analyzing texts to see what percentage of words the user knows. A prototype of Hedera was built for Latin in order to create readable texts for beginning Latin students.

The project team aims to begin incorporating more languages into Hedera, starting with Ancient Greek and Russian. New features include a reading environment, where the user can access their custom glossary, and making the platform adaptive by offering recommended readings as the learner’s vocabulary grows. The team hopes that Hedera will be adopted by instructors, students, and independent learners.

More information is available at the following links:

Entangled Sea(faring): Reconsidering the Connection between the Ships of the Sea Peoples, the Aegean, and 'Urnfield' Europe
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Entangled Sea(faring): Reconsidering the Connection between the Ships of the Sea Peoples, the Aegean, and 'Urnfield' Europe. In The Entangled Sea: The Mediterranean Sea in Ancient History and Prehistory . University of Manchester, June 12–13.Abstract
The naval battle representation on the walls of Ramesses III’s ‘mansion of a million years’ at Medinet Habu (ca. 1175 BCE) stands as one of the earliest, and certainly most detailed, depictions of ship–to–ship combat. It also depicts the only known vessels of Helladic galley type to be depicted with stem–and–stern avian decoration. As such, they have been called upon as evidence for the inclusion of Central Europeans (‘Urnfielders’) in the Sea Peoples coalition(s), and – more recursively – to bolster the view that the highly schematic designs on the stemposts of Helladic galleys were avian in nature. This paper addresses these conclusions and evaluates the evidence that has been presented for an ‘Urnfield’ connection to the Sea Peoples’ ships, along with some notes on the ostensibly avian nature of Helladic galleys’ finial decorations.
Black Ships and Sea Raiders: History, Archaeology, and Odyssey in the Late Bronze–Early Iron Age Transition
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Black Ships and Sea Raiders: History, Archaeology, and Odyssey in the Late Bronze–Early Iron Age Transition. In . Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University, April 30. Click Here to DownloadAbstract
This lecture was given at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology (Brown University) on April 30, 2018. The topic is a condensed version of the 2017 book "Black Ships and Sea Raiders: The Late Bronze and Early Iron Age Context of Odysseus' Second Cretan Lie" (Lanham: Lexington): https://www.academia.edu/35561019/Black_Ships_and_Sea_Raiders_The_Late_B...
Tunç Çağı Sonunda ilk Deniz Savaşları (The Beginning of Naval Warfare and the End of the Bronze Age)
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Tunç Çağı Sonunda ilk Deniz Savaşları (The Beginning of Naval Warfare and the End of the Bronze Age). Aktüel Arkeoloji (Actual Archaeology Magazine) , 61, 28-39. Click Here to DownloadAbstract
Throughout human history, the sea has served as a means of subsistence, transportation, and communication, as well as a place of danger and death. From the time ships first set out with cargo on board, there have probably been pirates lying in ambush either to seize the ships at sea or to attack coastal settlements in search of plunder. This was certainly the case in the Late Bronze Age, even before the chaotic end of this period and beginning of the succeeding Iron Age, around 1200 BC.
It Takes a Village: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Supporting and Facilitating Digital Scholarship
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). It Takes a Village: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Supporting and Facilitating Digital Scholarship. In 2018 Digital Initiatives Symposium . University of San Diego, April 22–25. Click Here to DownloadAbstract
The continued increase of digital tools and methods in both teaching and research has created a need for initial and ongoing support within institutions. While each institution has its own specific needs, we can learn a great deal from each other's approaches and experiences. This presentation offers as a case study Harvard University's recent (and ongoing) experience working across groups and divisional boundaries to support digital scholarship, digital methods-related courses, and the integration of digital components into courses and assignments through training, consultation, and the development and implementation of digital tools and methods.
Practice, Publication, and Pedagogy: Exploring Digital Approaches to all Phases of Archaeology (ORGANIZER and CHAIR)
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Practice, Publication, and Pedagogy: Exploring Digital Approaches to all Phases of Archaeology (ORGANIZER and CHAIR). In Joint Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Society for Classical Studies, Boston, MA, January 4–7.
IIIF Media Management for the Classroom and Beyond
Barrett, A., Bentley, B., Emanuel, J. P., & Hilborn, M. (2018). IIIF Media Management for the Classroom and Beyond. In Educause Learning Initiative (ELI) Annual Meeting . New Orleans, LA, January 29–31.
Digital Tools and Techniques for Teaching Archaeology  (ORGANIZER and SESSION CHAIR)
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Digital Tools and Techniques for Teaching Archaeology (ORGANIZER and SESSION CHAIR). In Human History and Digital Future . 46th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2018), University of Tübingen, Germany, March 19–23.Abstract

The goal of this session is to convene practitioners in a dialogue that is focused on examples of digitally-informed approaches to archaeological instruction in any setting. This can include field schools, workshops, seminars, massive open online courses (MOOCs), and more. Contributions to this session can consist of successful approaches to integrating digital methods into the instruction of archaeology and cultural heritage, either in the classroom, online, or via hybrid methods, as well as lessons learned from approaches that were not as successful as desired.

This session is partly planned as a follow-up to the CAA 2017 session Archaeology In and Out of the Classroom." We envision it as being interactive in nature: paper presentations may be supplemented by demonstrations of digital tools and approaches, and projects that are in the planning or pilot stage, or that are in need of reworking to improve results, can be discussed or workshopped by session participants. The ultimate goals for presenters and attendees alike are to gain better understanding of pedagogical approaches to archaeology, to leave better equipped to intelligently apply digital methods and tools to teaching, and to have made contacts within a community of practice to whom they can go with future ideas, questions, and challenges.

Immersive Techniques in Archaeological Practice and Publication (ORGANIZER and SESSION CHAIR)
Emanuel, J. P. (2018). Immersive Techniques in Archaeological Practice and Publication (ORGANIZER and SESSION CHAIR). In Human History and Digital Future . 46th Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Conference (CAA 2018), University of Tübingen, Germany, March 19–23.Abstract

This session focuses on the thoughtful integration of digital methods into the processes of gathering, recording, interrogating, and publishing archaeological data. Digital publications, geospatial datasets, and three-dimensional presentation are examples of interactive approaches to what has been called “digital archaeology.” This interactivity can be taken a step further, as approaches like Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality (AR, VR, and MR) allow for the fostering of immersive experiences around the reconstruction, visualization, and presentation of archaeological data.

This session highlights all aspects of digital innovation in the survey, excavation, interrogation, and publication process, with particular emphasis on 3D modeling and printing, data interoperability, and VR, AR, and MR. It is intended both to serve as a follow-up to the CAA 2017 session on 3D modeling, AR/VR, and immersion (chaired by the session proposer), and to foster further discussion about the uses of interactive and immersive technologies both in the field, and in the presentation and analysis of objects and datasets.

The format of this session will be a combination of interactive presentation and discussion, with a specific emphasis on demonstrations of 3D reconstruction, Virtual/Augmented and Mixed Reality experiences, online presentation, and other interactive and immersive approaches to excavation, recording, and dissemination. Our goal is to cultivate a needed community of practice and shared knowledge around these techniques and approaches, while working together to support the highest quality of digital methods and processes in archaeological practice.