Classes

Ballots and Bibles: Why and How Americans Bring Scriptures into Their Politics

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2020

Summer Teaching Fellow under Professor David Holland

In 2018, in a public speech to law enforcement officers, the attorney general of the United States used a scriptural passage to defend tougher implementation of immigration laws. The scripture he cited reads, “the powers that be are ordained of God.” His reference bewildered observers who were unaware of a long tradition of citing Romans 13, from the New Testament, in American political controversies, including such formative conflicts as the American Revolution and the sectional crisis over slavery. 

This...

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Ballots and Bibles: Why and How Americans Bring Scriptures into Their Politics

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Head Teaching Fellow under Professor David Holland

In 2018, in a public speech to law enforcement officers, the attorney general of the United States used a scriptural passage to defend tougher implementation of immigration laws. The scripture he cited reads, “the powers that be are ordained of God.” His reference bewildered observers who were unaware of a long tradition of citing Romans 13, from the New Testament, in American political controversies, including such formative conflicts as the American Revolution and the sectional crisis over slavery.
This course introduces...

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Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Teaching Fellow under Professor David Holland, Harvard Divinity School

Unlike many humanistic disciplines, the study of religion does not invoke a particular method to examine a variety of subjects (e.g., as in history, or anthropology, or sociology). Rather, the study of religion has used a variety of methods to examine a particular subject, and it has developed an array of theoretical arguments about the nature of that subject. This course is designed to help students consider that subject, those methods and the challenging theoretical concerns that circulate around them....

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Reconfiguring Paradise: Utopian Dreams at the Edge of Social Possibility

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

Teaching Fellow under Professor Steven Jungkeit, Harvard Divinity School

This course begins with several interrelated questions: first, in an era when dystopian visions abound, what has become of the ability to imagine utopias, the time and space of human flourishing?  In a moment of far right political movements and ecological degradation, in a moment of economic inequality and social alienation, where are we to locate imaginative visions and practices of alternative social relations?  Philosophy and religion have long nourished...

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Confronting Religious Difference in Modern America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

Teaching Fellow under Professor K. Healan Gaston, Harvard Divinity School

This course will examine, through a conceptual and linguistic lens, the efforts of politicians, public commentators, religious leaders, scholars, and activists to negotiate the twin realities of growing religious diversity and deepening political division in the United States since the 1970s. It will familiarize students with a range of religious, political, and scholarly views of what we might term “diversity ideals”—especially those most closely linked to religion, such as “tolerance,” “religious...

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Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

Teaching Fellow under Professor David Holland, Harvard Divinity School

Unlike many humanistic disciplines, the study of religion does not invoke a particular method to examine a variety of subjects (e.g., as in history, or anthropology, or sociology).  Rather, the study of religion has used a variety of methods to examine a particular subject.  This course is designed to help students consider that subject, those methods and the challenging theoretical concerns that circulate around them.  Because the field of religion is vast—in its sources and its approaches—...

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Religion, Education, and Democracy

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2015

Teaching Fellow under Professor Diane Moore, Harvard Divinity School

The focus of this course is to develop an understanding of the evolving relationship among religion, secularism, democracy and public education in the United States. Our exploration will include 1) a historical review of the relationship between religion and public education in the U.S. with special attention to pivotal Supreme Court decisions that have shaped public policy discourses in these areas over the past half century; 2) a consideration of the social and moral consequences that stem from...

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Applied Data Analysis

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2014

Visiting Lecturer in Psychology, Wesleyan University

In this project-based course, you will have the opportunity to answer questions that you feel passionately about through independent research based on existing data. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills in generating testable hypotheses, conducting a literature review, preparing data for analysis, conducting descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, and presenting research findings. The course offers unlimited one-on-one support, ample opportunities to work with other students, and training in the...

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