Teaching

Economics 970: Information in Financial Markets

Semester: Spring 2016

Second-year undergraduate course covering various aspects of information propagation in financial markets. The course is divided into four units. We begin by covering canonical pricing anomalies that illustrate the importance of information distribution and consumption in financial markets. The course then presents current research on reactions to information contained in news, before addressing the question of whether sophisticated players such as institutional investors have superior skill in acquiring and processing information. The course concludes by examining some key psychological biases, such as overconfidence, that are likely to afflict even the most competent finance market participants.

Awarded Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching in 2016.


Economics 970: Behavioral Finance

Semester: Spring 2015

Second-year undergraduate course covering recent advances in the field of behavioral finance. The course begins by examining some of the most canonical pricing anomalies, such as claims to identical cashflows trading at different prices in different markets, and reprinting of five-months-old news leading to a large market reaction, irrelevant name changes boosting companies’ prices. Research covered in the class addresses the reasons that allow such mispricing to occur and persist. The course introduces the students to reading and critically evaluating research articles, and is heavily discussion-based.

Awarded Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching in 2015.


Economics 970: Behavioral Economics and Applications in Markets

Semester: Spring 2013, Spring 2014

Second-year undergraduate course introducing students to academic research in the field of behavioral economics. The course covers key models of time-inconsistent preferences, overconfidence, social preferences, and projection bias. The students are introduced to theoretical models of these behavioral biases as well as empirical and experimental tests of such models, and applications to a variety of real-world market interactions. The course is intensely discussion-based.

Awarded Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching in 2013 and 2014.