Publications

Books

  1. Permanent Revolution: The Reformation and the Illiberal Roots of Liberalism (Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2019), 444 pp.
  2. John Hardyng, Chronicle: Edited from British Library MS Lansdowne 204, co-edited with Sarah Peverley, Volume 1 (Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 2015), 342 pp.
  3. Reynard the Fox: A New Translation (New York: Liveright/Norton, 2015), 256 pp. 
  4. Under the Hammer: Iconoclasm in the Anglo-American Tradition, The Clarendon Lectures (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 222 pp.
  5. Burning to Read: English Fundamentalism and its Reformation Opponents (Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2007), 346 pp. (Paperback edition, Spring 2010)
  6. Piers Plowman: An Introduction to the B-Text, second, revised edition (Exeter:  Exeter University Press, 2007)
  7. Reform and Cultural Revolution, 1350-1547,  The Oxford English Literary History: Volume 2, General Editor Jonathan Bate (Oxford University Press, 2002), xviii + 663 pp. (Paperback edition 2004)
  8. Sciences and the Self in Medieval Poetry: Alan of Lille’s “Anticlaudianus” and John Gower’s “Confessio amantis,” Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, 25 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), xii + 321 pp. (Paperback edition 2005)
  9. Piers Plowman: An Introduction to the B-Text, Longman Medieval and Renaissance Library, 1 (Harlow, Essex: Longman, 1990), xi + 272 pp. (Paper back edition also published 1990) (Selection rpt in Piers Plowman, edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Stephen Shepherd (New York: Norton, 2006), 584-91
  10. Parisian Libraries, for The Index of Middle English Prose, General Editor A. S. G. Edwards (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1989), 38 pp.

Edited books 

  1. The Norton Anthology of English Literature, General Editor Stephen Greenblatt, tenth edition; “The Middle Ages,” ed. James Simpson (New York: W. W. Norton, 2017), 1-580 pp. The Norton Anthology of English Literature, General Editor Stephen Greenblatt, ninth edition; “The Middle Ages”, ed. Alfred David and James Simpson (New York: W. W. Norton, 2012), 1-529 pp.
  2. Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History, edited by Brian Cummings and James Simpson, Twenty-First Century Approaches, 2 (Oxford University Press, 2010), xii+689pp.
  3. Premodern Shakespeare, edited by Sarah Beckwith and James Simpson, a special issue of The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 40 (2010)
  4. The Morton Bloomfield Lectures, 1989-2005, edited by Daniel Donoghue, James Simpson and Nicholas Watson (Medieval Institute Publications: Kalamazoo, MI, 2010)
  5. The Norton Anthology of English Literature, General Editors Stephen Greenblatt and M. H. Abrams, eighth edition; “The Middle Ages”, ed. Alfred David and James Simpson (New York: W. W. Norton, 2006), 1-484
  6. John Lydgate: Poetry, Culture, and Lancastrian England, ed. Larry Scanlon and James Simpson (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2006)
  7. Images, Idolatry and Iconoclasm in Late Medieval England, edited by Jeremy Dimmick, James Simpson and Nicolette Zeeman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), xiv + 250 pp. June 2005: available in “Print on Demand” format.
  8. Medieval English Religious and Ethical Literature: Essays in Honour of G. H. Russell, edited by Gregory Kratzmann and James Simpson (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1986), 250 pp. 133-153

Articles

  1. “Unthinking Romance: Sir Degaré” for Thinking Medieval Romance, edited by Katherine C. Little and Nicola McDonald (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), pp. 36-54
  2. “Textual Face: Cognition as Recognition,” for Contemporary Chaucer across the Centuries, a Festschrift for Stephanie Trigg, edited by Helen M. Hickey, Anne McHendry and Melissa Raine (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2018), pp. 218-233
  3. “Subversive Laughter in Reynard the Fox” for Animals: a History, edited by Peter Adamson and G. Fay Edwards, Oxford Philosophical Concepts (Oxford: University press, 2017), pp. 157-62. This essay was also chosen to be posted in the website of the American Philosophical Association: https://blog.apaonline.org/2018/06/13/subversive-laughter-in-reynard-the...
  4. “2016. Interrogation Over. A Review Essay of Rita Felski, The Limits of Critique,” PMLA 132 (2017), 377-83
  5. “Brad Gregory’s Unintended Revelations,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 46 (2016), 545-54 
  6. “The Aeneid Translations of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey: the Exiled Reader’s Presence,” in The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature, Vol. 1:  The Middle Ages, edited by Rita Copeland (Oxford: OUP, 2016), 601-23
  7. ‘The Formless Ruin of Oblivion’: Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida and Literary Defacement,” for Love, History and Emotion in Chaucer and Shakespeare: Troilus and Criseyde and Troilus and Cressida, edited by Andrew Johnston, Russell West Pavlov and Elizabeth Kempf (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016), 189-206
  8. “The Psalms and Threat in Sixteenth-Century English Court Culture,” Renaissance Studies 29 (2015), 576-94
  9. “Not Yet: Chaucer and Anagogy,” Biennial Lecture of the New Chaucer Society, Studies in the Age of Chaucer 37 (2015), 31-54
  10. “Human Prudence versus the Emotion of the Cosmos: War, Deliberation and Destruction in the Late Medieval Statian Tradition,” in Emotions and War, edited by Andrew Lynch, Stephanie Downes, and Katrina O'Loughlin (Palgrave McMillan, 2015), pp. 98-116
  11. “Glassy Temporalities: The Chapel Windows of King’s College Cambridge,” for a volume devoted to King’s College Chapel, Cambridge, in celebration of its 500th anniversary, edited by Nicolette Zeeman and Jean Michel Massing (London: Harvey Miller Publishers, 2014), pp. 79-95
  12. “Iconoclasm: Early Modern Britain and America,” entry for Oxford Encyclopaedia of Aesthetics, second edition, edited by Michael Kelly, 6 vols. (Oxford University Press, 2014), 3:400-403
  13. “Iconoclasm and the Enlightenment Museum,” in  Striking Images: Iconoclasms Past and Present, edited by Stacy Boldrick, Leslie Brubaker and Richard Clay (Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2013), pp. 113-27
  14. "Religious Forms and Institutions in Piers Plowman,” in The Cambridge Companion to Piers Plowman, edited by Andrew Cole and Andy Galloway (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), 97-116
  15. “Derek Brewer’s Romance,” in A Modern Medievalist: Traditions and Innovations in the Study of Medieval Literature, edited by Charlotte Brewer and Barry Windeatt (Cambridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2013), pp. 154-72
  16. (Co-author and principal author) “The Teaching of the Arts and Humanities at Harvard College: Mapping the Future” (2013), at  http://artsandhumanities.fas.harvard.edu/
  17. “Cognition is Recognition: Literary Knowledge and Textual ‘Face,’” New Literary History, 44 (2013): 25-44
  18. “John Bale’s Three Laws,” in The Oxford Handbook to Tudor Drama, edited by Greg Walker and Tom Betteridge (Oxford University Press, 2012), 109-22
  19. “No Brainer: The Early Modern Tragedy of Torture,” Religion and Literature, 43 (2011): 1-23
  20. “The Reformation of Scholarship: A Reply to Debora Shuger,” by The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 42 (2012): 249-68
  21. “Orthodoxy’s Image Trouble: Images in and After Arundel’s Constitutions,” for After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England, edited by Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh is (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2011), 91-113
  22. “Killing Authors: Skelton’s Dreadful Bouge of Court,” in Form and Reform: Reading the Fifteenth Century, edited by Kathleen Tonry and Shannon Gayk (Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2011), 180-96
  23. “Visionary Writing in England, 1534-1550s,” The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Mysticism, edited by Vincent Gillespie and Samuel Fanous (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 249-64
  24. “’Not Just a Museum’? Not so Fast,” for a special volume (“Something Fearful”: Medievalist Scholars on the “Religious Turn” in Literary Criticism) of Religion and Literature 42 (2010), 141-61
  25. ‘“And that was litel nede”: Poetry’s Need in Robert Henryson’s Fables and Testament of Cresseid’, in Medieval Latin and Middle English Literature, edited by Christopher Cannon and Maura Nolan (Cambridge: Brewer, 2011), 193-210
  26. “Introduction,” co-written with Brian Cummings, for Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History, edited by Brian Cummings and James Simpson, Twenty-First Century Approaches, 2 (Oxford University Press, 2010), 1-9
  27. “Place,” in Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History, edited by Brian Cummings and James Simpson, Twenty-First Century Approaches, 2 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 95-112
  28.  “Premodern Shakespeare,” co-written with Sarah Beckwith, for Premodern Shakespeare, edited by Sarah Beckwith and James Simpson, a special issue of The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 40 (2010): 2-5
  29. “Rhetoric, Conscience and the Playful Positions of Sir Thomas More” for The Oxford Handbook to Tudor Literature, 1485-1603, edited by Mike Pincombe and Cathy Shrank (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), 121-36 (This volume won the Sixteenth Century Society's Roland H. Bainton Prize, 2010)
  30. “Sixteenth-Century Fundamentalism and the Specter of Ambiguity, or The Literal Sense is Always a Fiction” for Writing Fundamentalism, ed. Klaus Stierstorfer and Axel Stähler (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009), 133-54
  31.  “John Lydgate,” in The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Literature, edited by Larry Scanlon (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 205-16
  32. “The Economy of Involucrum: Idleness in Reason and Sensuality,” in Through a Classical Eye: Transcultural and Transhistorical Visions in Medieval English, Italian, and Latin Literature in Honor of Winthrop Wetherbee, edited by Andrew Galloway and R. F. Yeager (University of Toronto Press, 2009), 390-414
  33. “Vernacular Literary Consciousness, c. 1100 – c. 1500: French, German and English Evidence,” with Kevin Brownlee, Tony Hunt, Ian Johnson, Alastair Minnis, and Nigel F. Palmer, in The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism, volume 2, The Middle Ages, edited by Alastair Minnis and Ian Johnson, paperback edition (incorrectly not listed as such in the hardback edition), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), 422-71
  34. “Tyndale as Promoter of Figural Allegory and Figurative Language: A Brief Declaration of the Sacraments,” for Archiv für das Studium der Neueren Sprachen und Literaturen 245 (2008): 37-55
  35.  “Bonjour Paresse: Literary Waste and Recycling in Book 4 of Gower’s Confessio amantis,” The Sir Israel Gollancz Memorial Lecture, Publications of the British Academy, 151 (2007), 257-84
  36. “Diachronic History and the Shortcomings of Medieval Studies,” in Reading the Medieval in Early Modern England, edited by David Matthews and Gordon McMullan (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007), 17-30
  37. “Making History Whole: Diachronic History and the Shortcomings of Medieval Studies”, in e-Colloquia, 3 (2005), at http://www.ecolloquia.com/issues/200501/index.html
  38. “Confessing Literature,” English Language Notes 44 (2006): 121-26
  39.  “Introduction,” in John Lydgate: Poetry, Culture, and Lancastrian England, ed. Larry Scanlon and James Simpson (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2006), co-written with Larry Scanlon, pp. 1-11
  40. “’For al my body…weieth nat an unce’: Empty Poets and Rhetorical Weight in Lydgate’s Churl and the Bird,” in John Lydgate: Poetry, Culture, and Lancastrian England, ed. Larry Scanlon and James Simpson (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2006), 129-46
  41. “Chaucer as a European Writer,” in The Yale Companion to Chaucer, ed. Seth Lerer (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005), 55-86
  42. “An Appendix of Literary Terms,” in Norton Anthology of English Literature, 8, Co-Editor Alfred David, General Editor Stephen Greenblatt (W. W. Norton: New York. 2006), 19 pages
  43. “Consuming Ethics: Caxton’s History of Reynard the Fox,” in Studies in Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Texts in Honour of John Scattergood, edited by Alan Fletcher and Anne-Marie D’Arcy (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005), pp. 321-36
  44. “Subjects of Triumph and Literary History: Dido and Petrarch in Petrarch’s Trionfi and Africa,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 35 (2005): 489-508. Translated and republished as “Soggetti di trionfo e storia letteraria: Didone e Petrarca nell’Africa e nei Trionfi di Petrarca,” in Petrarca: canoni, esemplarità, edited by Valeria Finucci (Rome: Bulzoni, 2006), 73-92
  45. “Saving Satire after Arundel: John Audelay’s Marcol and Solomon,”in Text and Controversy from Wyclif to Bale, Essays in Honour of Anne Hudson, edited by Ann Hutchison and Helen Barr (Turnhout: Brepols, 2005), 387-404
  46. “Not the Last Word,” being a reply to review articles for a number of JMEMS wholly dedicated to consideration of Reform and Cultural Revolution, JMEMS, 35 (2005), 111-19.
  47. “Pecock and Fortescue,” for A Companion to Middle English Prose, edited by A. S. G. Edwards (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2004), pp. 271-88
  48. “Martyrdom in the Literal Sense: Surrey’s Psalm Paraphrases,” Medieval and Early Modern English Studies (South Korea), 12 (2004), 133-165
  49.  “Humanism,” in Dictionary of the Middle Ages. Supplement 1. William Chester Jordan, Editor in Chief (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2004), pp. 279-82
  50. “Chaucer’s Presence and Absence, 1400-1550,” A Chaucer Companion, edited  by Jill Mann and Piero Boitani, second edition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), pp. 251-69
  51. “Faith and Hermeneutics: Pragmatism versus Pragmatism,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 33 (2003), 215-39
  52. “The Rule of Medieval Imagination,” in Images, Idolatry and Iconoclasm in Late Medieval England, edited by Jeremy Dimmick, James Simpson and Nicolette Zeeman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), pp. 4-24
  53. “The Power of Impropriety: Authorial Naming in Piers Plowman,” in William Langland’s Piers Plowman: A Book of Essays, edited by Kathleen M. Hewett-Smith (New York: Routledge, 2001), pp. 145-165
  54. “Grace Abounding: Evangelical Centralisation and the End of Piers Plowman,” Yearbook of Langland Studies, 14 (2000), 1-25
  55. “Bulldozing the Middle Ages: the Case of “John Lydgate,” New Medieval Literatures, 4 (2000), 213-42
  56. “Medieval Literature, Class 1,” in The Virtual Classroom, http://www.english.cam.ac.uk/vclass/virtclas.htm, 2000-
  57. “Contemporary English Writers,” in A Companion to Chaucer, edited by Peter Brown (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000), pp. 114-32 
  58. “The Sacrifice of Lady Rochford: Henry Parker’s Translation of De claris mulieribus,” in “Triumphs of English”: Henry Parker, Lord Morley, Translator to the Tudor Court. New Essays in Interpretation, edited by Marie Axton and James P. Carley (London: British Library Publications, 2000), pp. 153-69
  59. “Violence, Narrative and Proper Name: Sir Degaré, “The Tale of Sir Gareth of Orkney,” and the Anglo-Norman Folie Tristan dOxford,” in The Spirit of Medieval English Popular Romance, ed. Jane Gilbert and Ad Putter (Harlow: Longman, 2000), 122-41
  60. “Breaking the Vacuum: Ricardian and Henrician Ovidianism,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 29 (1999), 325-55
  61. “Ethics and Interpretation: Reading Wills in Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women,” Studies in the Age of Chaucer, 20 (1998), 73-100
  62. “Hoccleve,” “Usk” and “Beast Fable” entries for Medieval England: An Encyclopaedia, General Editor, Paul E. Szarmach (New York: Garland, 1998), 111-12
  63. “The Other Book of Troy: Guido delle Colonne’s Historia destructionis Troiae in Fourteenth and Fifteenth-Century England,” Speculum, 73 (1998), 397-423. Reprinted in Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism (Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co.), Volume 90
  64. “Ageism: Leland, Bale and the Laborious Start of English Literary History, 1350-1550,” New Medieval Literatures, 1 (1997), 213-35
  65. ““Dysemol daies and Fatal houres”: Lydgate’s Destruction of Thebes and Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale,” in The Long Fifteenth Century: Essays in Honour of Douglas Gray, edited by Helen Cooper and Sally Mapstone (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 15-33
  66. “Desire and the Scriptural Text: Will as Reader in Piers Plowman,” in Criticism and Dissent in the Middle Ages, edited by Rita Copeland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), pp. 215-43
  67. “Nobody’s Man: Thomas Hoccleve’s Regement of Princes,” in London and Europe, edited by Julia Boffey and Pamela King  (London: Westfield Publications in Medieval Studies, 1995), pp. 150-80
  68. ““Ut Pictura Poesis”: A Critique of Robert Jordan’s Chaucer and the Shape of Creation,” in Interpretation Medieval and Modern: J.A.W.Bennett Memorial Lectures, eighth series, edited by Piero Boitani and Anna Torti (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1993), pp. 167-87
  69. “The Death of the Author?: Skelton’s Bowge of Court,” in The Timeless and the Temporal, Writings in Honour of John Chalker, edited by Elizabeth Maslen (London: Queen Mary and Westfield College, 1993), pp. 58-79
  70. “The Information of Genius in Book III of the Confessio Amantis,” Mediaevalia, 16 (1993, for 1990), 159-95
  71. “’After Craftes Conseil clotheth yow and fede’: Langland and the City of London,” in England in the Fourteenth Century, Proceedings of the Harlaxton Conference, 1991, edited by N. Rogers (Stamford: Paul Watkins, 1993), pp. 109-127
  72. “The Information of Alan of Lille’s Anticlaudianus: a Preposterous Interpretation,” Traditio 47 (1992), 113-160
  73. “Madness and Texts: Hoccleve’s Series,” in Chaucer and Fifteenth Century Poetry, edited by Janet Cowen and Julia Boffey, King’s College London Medieval Studies, 5 (London: King’s College, London, 1991), pp. 15-29
  74. “The Constraints of Satire in Mum and the Sothsegger and Piers Plowman,” in Langland, the Mystics and the Medieval English Religious Tradition, edited by Helen Phillips (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1990), pp. 11-30
  75. “Poetry as Knowledge: Dante’s Paradiso XIII,” Forum for Modern Language Studies, 25 (1989), 329-43
  76. “Ironic Incongruence in the Prologue and Book I of Gower’s Confessio Amantis,” Neophilologus, 72 (1988), 617-32
  77. “Spirituality and Economics in Passus I-VII of the B-Text of Piers Plowman,” The Yearbook of Langland Studies, 1 (1987), 83- 103
  78. “The Role of Scientia in Piers Plowman,” in Medieval English Religious and Ethical Literature: Essays in Honour of G.H.Russell, edited by Gregory Kratzmann and James Simpson (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1986), pp. 49-65
  79. “From Reason to Affective Knowledge: Modes of Thought and Poetic Form in Piers Plowman,” Medium Aevum, 55 (1986), 1-23
  80. “The Transformation of Meaning: a Figure of Thought in Piers Plowman,” Review of English Studies, n.s. 37 (1986), 1-23
  81. “Dante’s “Astripetam Aquilam” and the Theme of Poetic Discretion in the House of Fame,” Essays and Studies, n.s. 39 (1986), 1-18
  82.  “Et Vidit Deus Cogitationes Eorum: a Parallel Instance and Possible Source for Langland’s Use of a Biblical Formula at Piers Plowman B.XV.200a,” Notes and Queries, n.s. 33 (1986), 9-13
  83. “Spiritual and Earthly Nobility in Piers Plowman,” Neuphilologische Mitteilungen, 86 (1985), 467-81

Reviews

  1. J. A. Burrow, Medieval Writers and their Work; Boris Ford (ed.), Medieval Literature, Part I; and Stephen Medcalf (ed.), The Later Middle Ages, in Medium Aevum 53 (1984), 307-11
  2. Janet Coleman, “Piers Plowman” and the “Moderni,” in Medium Aevum 53 (1984), 125-27
  3. William Wallon, Inconsistencies: Studies in the New Testament, the Inferno, Othello and Beowulf , in Notes and Queries, n.s. 31 (1984), 413-15
  4. Piero Boitani, Chaucer and the Italian Trecento, in Medium Aevum 54 (1985), 306-8
  5. Guy Bourquin, “Piers Plowman:” Etudes sur la genèse littéraire des trois versions, in Medium Aevum 54 (1985), 302-4
  6. M. L. Colish, The Mirror of Language: a Study in the Medieval Theory of Knowledge, in Medium Aevum 55 (1986), 123-25
  7. Howard H. Schless, Chaucer and Dante: a Revaluation in Medium Aevum 56 (1987), 120-23
  8. David Wallace, Chaucer and the Early Writings of Boccaccio, in Medium Aevum 56 (1987), 323-24
  9. Lavinia Griffiths, Personification in “Piers Plowman,” in Notes and Queries n.s. 34 (1987), 63-64
  10. Julia Bolton Hollaway, The Pilgrim and the Book: a Study of Dante, Langland and Chaucer in Medium Aevum, 59 (1990), 144-6
  11. A.J.Minnis and A.B.Scott (eds.), Medieval Literary Theory and Criticism, c.1100-c.1375: the Commentary Tradition, in Medium Aevum 59 (1990), 140-42
  12. Wendy Scase, “Piers Plowman” and the New Anticlericalism, in Notes and Queries n.s. 37 (1990), 455-56
  13. Cindy L. Vitto, The Virtuous Pagan in Middle English Literature, in Cahiers de Civilisation Médiévale (1991)
  14. Derek Pearsall, An Annotated Bibliography of Langland, in Notes and Queries n.s. 38 (1991), 358-59
  15. Anna Torti, The Glass of Form: Mirroring Structures from Chaucer to Skelton in Medium Aevum 61 (1992), 323-24
  16. Pamela Raabe, Imitating God: the Allegory of Faith in “Piers Plowman,” in Medium Aevum 61 (1992), 121-3
  17. Kathryn Kerby-Fulton, Reformist Apocalyticism and “Piers Plowman” in Journal of Ecclesiastical History 42 (1991), 664
  18. Piero Boitani and Anna Torti (eds.), Religion in the Poetry and Drama of the Late Middle Ages in England, in Notes and Queries n.s. 40 (1993), 361-2
  19. A.J. Minnis (ed.), Chaucer’s “Boece” and the Medieval Tradition of Boethius, in Notes and Queries, n.s. 41 (1994), 544-45
  20. Helen Barr, ed. The “Piers Plowman” Tradition, in SAC 16 (1994), 150-52
  21. J.A. Burrow, Langland’s Fictions, in Medium Aevum 63 (1994), 328-29
  22. J.A.Burrow, Thomas Hoccleve in Medium Aevum 65 (1996), 179
  23. Richard G. Newhauser and John Alford, eds., Literature and Religion in the Later Middle Ages: Philological Studies in Honor of  Siegfried Wenzel, in YLS, 11 (1997), 230-32
  24. Richard J. Utz, ed., Literary Nominalism and the Theory of Rereading Late Medieval Texts, in Anglia (1999)
  25. Seth Lerer, Courtly Letters in the Age of Henry VIII: Literary Culture and the Arts of Deceit, in Medium Aevum 68 (1999), 135-36
  26. Theresa M. Krier, ed., Refiguring Chaucer in the Renaissance, in Mediaevalia et Humanistica n.s. 26 (1999), 197-99
  27. David Wallace, ed. The Cambridge History of Medieval English Literature, in Medium Aevum 69 (2000), 127-30
  28. John Scattergood, The Lost Tradition: Essays on Middle English Alliterative Poetry, in Review of English Studies, forthcoming, 109-111
  29. Kathryn L. Lynch, Chaucer’s Philosophical Visions, in Modern Language Review 98 (2003), 426-27
  30. Russell A. Peck, ed. John Gower, Confessio Amantis, in Speculum 76 (2001), 943-4
  31. Ethan Knapp, The Bureaucratic Muse: Thomas Hoccleve and the Literature of Late Medieval England, in Studies in the Age of Chaucer 25 (2003): 394-97
  32. Ian Gadd and Alexandra Gillespie, eds., John Stow (1525-1605) and the Making of the English Past: Studies in Early Modern Culture and the History of the Book. (London: The British Library, 2004), for Speculum 81 (2006), 849-50
  33. Ralph Hanna, London Literature, 1300-1380, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. xxi, 359, for Studies in the Age of Chaucer 28 (2006): 290-93
  34.  Bruce Holsinger, The Premodern Condition: Medievalism and the Making of Theory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, for Speculum 82 (2006), 198-200
  35. John Bowers, Chaucer and Langland: The Antagonistic Tradition. Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2007, for Studies in the Age of Chaucer, 30 (2008), 343-46
  36. J.A. Burrow, The Poetry of Praise (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), for Notes and Queries, 56 (2009): 278-280
  37. Bruce Gordon, Calvin (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009), Times Literary Supplement, December 18 and 25, 2009, 34
  38. Alastair Minnis, Translations of Authority in Medieval English Literature: Valuing the Vernacular (Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009), for Notes and Queries  (published online September 10, 2010)
  39. David Aers Sanctifying Signs: Making Christian Tradition in Late Medieval England (Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2004), and David Aers, Salvation and Sin: Augustine, Langland, and Fourteenth-Century Theology (Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009), for Yearbook of Langland Studies, 24 (2011), 205-9
  40. James Kearney, The Incarnate Text: Imagining the Book in Reformation England (Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press, 2009), forthcoming in Modern Philology 110 (2012)
  41. Lee Patterson, Acts of Recognition, Essays on Medieval Culture (Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2010), Speculum 87 (2012), 268-70
  42. Rosemarie McGerr, A Lancastrian Mirror for Princes: The Yale Law School New Statutes of England. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. 2011, American Historical Review 118 (2013), 569-70
  43. William Kuskin, Recursive Origins: Writing at the Transition to Modernity (Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2013, Modern Philology 112 (2014), 35-7
  44. Medieval Shakespeare: Pasts and Presents, edited by Ruth Morse, Helen Cooper and Peter Holland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England 28 (2015), pp. 196-99
  45. Margaret Aston, Broken Idols of the English Reformation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016), for Material Religion 14 (2018), pp. 263–264; https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17432200.2018.1442199