Near Eastern Landscapes and Declassified U2 Aerial Imagery

Citation:

Emily L. Hammer and Jason A. Ur. 2019. “Near Eastern Landscapes and Declassified U2 Aerial Imagery.” Advances in Archaeological Practice. Open Access Publisher's Version Copy at https://j.mp/2Ail0NM
Near Eastern Landscapes and Declassified U2 Aerial Imagery

Abstract:

Recently declassified photographs taken by U2 spy planes in the 1950s and 1960s provide an important new source of historical aerial imagery useful for Eurasian archaeology. Like other sources of historical imagery, U2 photos provide a window into the past, before modern agriculture and development destroyed many archaeological sites. U2 imagery is older and in many cases higher resolution than CORONA spy satellite imagery, the other major source of historical imagery for Eurasia, and thus can expand the range of archaeological sites and features that can be studied from an aerial perspective. However, there are significant barriers to finding and retrieving U2 imagery of particular locales, and archaeologists have thus not yet widely used it. In this article, we aim to reduce these barriers by describing the U2 photo dataset and how to access it. We also provide the first spatial index of U2 photos for the Middle East. A brief discussion of archaeological case studies drawn from U2 imagery illustrates its merits and limitations. These case studies include investigations of prehistoric mass-kill hunting traps in eastern Jordan, irrigation systems of the first millennium BC Neo-Assyrian empire in northern Iraq, and twentieth-century marsh communities in southern Iraq.
See also: U2
Last updated on 05/11/2021