BIO

Joshua Jeong is a doctoral candidate in the department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He studies fathers and early child development. More specifically, he investigates fathers' roles for their young children's care, health, and development -- with respect to broader family, social, and cultural contexts in low-income countries. He has conducted a qualitative study on fathers' caregiving and coparenting in rural Pakistan; reviewed and synthesized the global evidence on parenting interventions to inform WHO Guidelines for improving early child development; and is currently designing and evaluating an integrated parenting intervention to engage both fathers and mothers for promoting healthy early child nutrition and development in rural Tanzania. His doctoral research has been supported by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau Training Grant, the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (proficiency in Kiswahili), the Djokovic Science and Innovation Fellowship at the Harvard Center on the Developing Child, and multiple other research funding awards.

Joshua has engaged in various research projects broadly pertaining to child and family health. He has previously worked on a quasi-experimental evaluation of an intervention study aimed at improving early childhood education and learning in Ghana; a national baseline evaluation study of early childhood development for UNICEF Rwanda; and an open trial of a family strengthening intervention to support family resilience and reduce the risk of mental health problems in children and families affected by HIV/AIDS in Rwanda. Additionally, he has a range of prior field experiences across sub-Saharan Africa, supporting implementation research and evaluation of programs for international organizations which include UNICEF, Innovations for Poverty Action, Partners in Health, and Population Council.

Joshua holds an MSc in Global Health and Population from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a BS in Human Development from Cornell University.