Publications

2000
Encounters in the New World: A History in Documents
Lepore, J. 2000. Encounters in the New World: A History in Documents. New York: Oxford University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract
A collection of primary sources documenting the early clash of cultures in the Americas, Encounters in the New World spans the years from Columbus's voyage in 1492 to the publication of the autobiography of Olaudah Equiano, a former slave, in 1789. Emotional eyewitness accounts--memoirs, petitions, diaries, captivity narratives, private correspondence--as well as formal documents, official reports, and journalistic reportage give body and texture to the historical events described. A special 16-page color cartographic section, including maps from both Europe and North America, is fascinating not only for the maps' telltale imperfections, but also because they convey information about how their creators saw themselves and the world around them. A Jesuit priest's chronicle of life among his Iroquois captors, Aztec records of forbidding omens, excerpts from Columbus's ship's log, John Smith's account of cannibalism among the British residents of Jamestown, slave auction advertisements, memoirs by several members of Cortes's expedition, the reminiscences of an escaped slave-these are just a few examples of the wealth of primary sources collected here. Jill Lepore, winner of the distinguished Bancroft Prize for history in 1999, provides informed, expert commentary linking the documents into a fascinating and seamless narrative. Textbooks may interpret history, but the books in the Pages from History series are history. Each title, compiled and edited by a prominent historian, is a collection of primary sources relating to a particular topic of historical significance. Documentary evidence including news articles, government documents, memoirs, letters, diaries, fiction, photographs, and facsimiles allows history to speak for itself and turns every reader into a historian. Headnotes, extended captions, sidebars, and introductory essays provide the essential context that frames the documents. All the books are amply illustrated and each spans the years froincludes a documentary picture essay, chronology, further reading, source notes, and index.
Lepore, J. 2000. “Playing Dress Up.” Common-place 1 (1). WebsiteAbstract

"Aging hats and casting brass button moulds is all well and good, and probably Oscar worthy, but what's the point if no one bothers to research speechways or family life or race relations or colonial politics?"

1998
The Name of War:  King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity
Lepore, J. 1998. The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity. New York: Vintage. WebsiteAbstract

King Philip's War, the excruciating racial war--colonists against Indians--that erupted in New England in 1675, was, in proportion to population, the bloodiest in American history. Some even argued that the massacres and outrages on both sides were too horrific to "deserve the name of a war." Telling the story of what may have been the bitterest of American conflicts, and its reverberations over the centuries, Lepore has enabled us to see how the ways in which we remember past events are as important in their effect on our history as were the events themselves.

Lepore, J. 1998. “"Remembering American Frontiers: King Philip’s War and the American Imagination".” Contact Points: North American Frontiers, 1750-1830, edited by F Teute and A Cayton. University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill.
1994
Lepore, J. 1994. “"Dead Men Tell No Tales: John Sassamon and the Fatal Consequences of Literacy".” American Quarterly 46: 479-512.
204
Lepore, Jill. 204AD. “Hello Dolly: On Likeness.” newyorker.com, February 6, 2014. Article

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