Publications

2011
Lepore, J. 2011. “"Not Everyone is Toppled".” Room for Debate, nytimes.com. Publisher's Version
Lepore, J. 2011. “Objection: Clarence Darrow's Unfinished Work.” The New Yorker, May 23, 2011. Article
Lepore, J. 2011. “Past and Present with Jill Lepore: The Politics of Death.” The Brian Lehrer Show. WNYC. Audio
Lepore, J. 2011. “The Uses of American History: An Interview with Jill Lepore.” Historically Speaking (Project MUSE) 12 (2): 23-24. Abstract
Historically Speaking editor Randall Stephens spoke with Lepore about the uses of history, the politicization of the past, and writing for the general public.
Lepore, J. 2011. “History lessons.” CommonWealth. Article Abstract

Jill Lepore says the Tea Party movement has embraced an approach to American history that is more rooted in religious fundamentalism than in any serious examination of the past.

Lepore, J. 2011. “Past and Present With Jill Lepore: The 1765 Death of Newspapers.” The Brian Lehrer Show. WNYC. Audio
Lepore, J. 2011. “"Our Second Gilded Age".” Room for Debate, nytimes.com. Publisher's Version
Lepore, J. 2011. “"A Good Bad Guy".” Room for Debate, nytimes.com. Publisher's Version
Lepore, J. 2011. ““A World of Paine”.” Revolutionary Founders, edited by G Nash, A Young, and R Raphael. New York: Knopf.
Lepore, J. 2011. “How Longfellow Woke the Dead.” The American Scholar 81: 2-15. Article
Lepore, J. 2011. “Twilight: Growing old and even older.” The New Yorker, March 14, 2011. Article
Bibliography
Lepore, J. 2011. “The Commandments: the Constitution and its worshippers.” The New Yorker. Article
Bibliography
Lepore, J. 2011. “Poor Jane’s Almanac.” New York Times, sec. Opinion. Publisher's Version
2010
Lepore, J. 2010. “Jill Lepore: Tea Party Time… and the Death of Compassion.” Radio Open Source. Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University. Publisher's Version
Lepore, J. 2010. “The Tea Party, A Modern Movement.” Talk of the Nation. NPR. Publisher's Version Abstract
The Tea Party movement mystifies outsiders on the left and the right. Tea Party activists often describe themselves as patriots, who stand for limited government, lower taxes and fiscal responsibility. Critics have charged members with everything from lack of focus to racism.
Lepore, J. 2010. “Interview.” The Callie Crossley Show. WGBH.

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