The Whites of Their Eyes:  The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle over American History
Lepore, J. 2010. The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle over American History. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.Abstract

Americans have always put the past to political ends. The Union laid claim to the Revolution--so did the Confederacy. Civil rights leaders said they were the true sons of liberty--so did Southern segregationists. This book tells the story of the centuries-long struggle over the meaning of the nation's founding, including the battle waged by the Tea Party, Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, and evangelical Christians to "take back America."

Lepore, Jill. 2010. “How To Write a Paper for This Class.” Historically Speaking 11 (1): 19-20. Jill Lepore How to Write a Paper for This Class 2009.pdf
Lepore, J. 2010. ““Hidebound”.” Times Literary Supplement. Article
Lepore, J. 2010. ““Tea Leaves”.” The Daily Beast.
Lepore, J. 2010. “Paul Revere’s Ride against Slavery.” New York Times, sec. Opinion. Website
Lepore, J. 2010. “His Highness: George Washington scales new heights.” The New Yorker. Article Bibliography
Lepore, J. 2010. “Too Much Information: Books about the birds and the bees.” The New Yorker. Article
Lepore, J. 2010. “The Uprooted: Chronicling the Great Migration.” The New Yorker. Article Bibliography
Lepore, J. 2010. “Tea and Sympathy: Who owns the American Revolution?.” The New Yorker. Article
Lepore, J. 2010. “Chan, the Man: On the trail of the honorable detective.” The New Yorker. Article
Lepore, J. 2010. ““The Iceman: What the leader of the cryonics movement is really preserving”.” The New Yorker, January 10, 2014. ArticleAbstract

AMERICAN CHRONICLES about Robert C. W. Ettinger, a founder of the cryonics movement. Robert C. W. Ettinger is ninety-one years old and he is a founder of the cryonics movement. When he dies, the blood will be drained from his body, antifreeze will be pumped into his arteries, and holes will be drilled in his skull, after which he will be stored in a vat of liquid nitrogen at minus three hundred and twenty degrees Fahrenheit. He expects to be defrosted, sometime between fifty and two hundred years from now, by scientists who will make him young and strong and tireless. Ettinger has already frozen his mother and his two wives, along with ninety-two other people who await resurrection inside giant freezers in a building just a few blocks from his house, in Clinton Township, Michigan. The Cryonics Institute occupies a seven-thousand-square-foot warehouse in an industrial park. Past a shabby waiting room is the small office of Andy Zawacki, who constitutes half of C.I.’s full-time staff. He is also one of C.I.’s more than eight hundred members, which means that he plans to be frozen when he dies. The writer visited the freezer storage area. There were fourteen cylindrical freezers. Each held six patients, and all but four were filled. There were also three older, rectangular freezers. The writer asked if the corpses were put in canisters within the cylinders. “No, in sleeping bags,” Ettinger said. Ettinger was born in Atlantic City in December of 1918. His mother’s family came from Odessa; his father was born in Germany. In about 1922, the family moved to Detroit. When he was eight years old, Ettinger started reading Amazing Stories, a sci-fi magazine. Ettinger dates his interest in immortality to 1931, when he read “The Jameson Satellite.” Mentions Ted Williams’s head, which was frozen and stored at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation, C.I.’s chief rival. “Neuropreservation” has a scientific attitude, but that doesn’t make it science. Credentialled laboratory scientists don’t generally think the dead will one day awaken. The consensus appears to be that when you try to defrost a frozen corpse you get mush. And even if, in the future, scientists could repair the damage done to cells by freezing and thawing, what they would have, at best, is a cadaver. Ettinger announced the dawn of what he called the Freezer Era at the height of the Cold War. His book, “The Prospect of Immortality,” appeared in 1964, the year “Dr. Strangelove” hit theatres. When the book came out, Ettinger became something of a star. The first human being was frozen in 1966; it went badly, and the body had to be buried a few months later. The following year, a man was frozen by an organization that later became the Cryonics Society of California. Ettinger’s father and brother were not frozen; they “were lost.” His first patient was his mother, Rhea, whom he froze in 1977. His second patient was his first wife, Elaine, who died in 1987. He remarried the following year. His second wife, Mae, suffered a stroke in 2000, and she was frozen as well. Ettinger finds nothing so uninteresting as history. Describes the writer and Ettinger going through his family photo albums.

Lepore, J. 2010. “"Fixed: The rise of marriage therapy, and other dreams of human betterment".” The New Yorker. Article Bibliography
Lepore, J. 2010. “"Untimely: What was at stake in the spat between Henry Luce and Harold Ross?".” The New Yorker. Article Bibliography
Polk, William Brian Clemenko. 2009. “"'This Slavery Breeds Ugly Passions in Man': Herman Melville's "Benito Cereno" and the Fugitive Slave Trials in 1850s Boston”.” Harvard University.
Lepore, J. 2009. “Jane Kamensky and Jill Lepore: Facts and Fictions in Revolutionary Boston.” Common-place 9 (3). Publisher's VersionAbstract
Common-place asks its founding editors about their collaboratively written novel, set in Revolutionary-era Boston—Blindspot, a Novel, by a Gentleman in Exile and a Lady in Disguise (2008)—and about relationships between history and fiction in general.
Lepore, J. 2009. “Footnotes to Fiction: Jane Kamensky and Jill Lepore.” Publisher's VersionAbstract
What happens when historians write fiction? We decided to find out. Blindspot, our novel, is set in 1764, in Boston, a city reeling from the economic downturn following the French and Indian War, and beginning to simmer with the fires of liberty. The book tells the story of Stewart Jameson, a Scottish portrait painter fleeing debtor’s prison, and Fanny Easton, the fallen daughter of one of Boston’s richest merchants, who poses as a boy to gain a situation as Jameson’s apprentice. Their lives take a turn when Samuel Bradstreet, Speaker of the Massachusetts Assembly, is murdered the day Jameson and Easton are to paint him.
Lepore, J. 2009. “Blindspot: Lepore and Kamensky in Olde Boston.” Radio Open Source. Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University. Publisher's Version
Lepore, J. 2009. “Back Talk: Jill Lepore and Jane Kamensky.” The Nation. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Jill Lepore, a professor of history at Harvard, and Jane Kamensky, a professor of history at Brandeis, met as graduate students in the 1980s. In 2007, the two began to write a historical novel. The product of that collaboration, the occasionally racy Blindspot (Spiegel & Grau, $24.95), tells the story of the portrait painter Stewart Jameson and his apprentice, "Francis Weston," née Fanny Easton, the disguised daughter of a prominent Bostonian. Lepore and Kamensky compiled glossaries, consulted collections of urban slang and lifted freely from eighteenth-century sources. With each in charge of one narrator--Lepore wrote Jameson's chapters, Kamensky Easton's letters--the two volleyed passages back and forth, like "a tennis game."--Christine Smallwood
Lepore, J. 2009. “The Exchange: Jill Lepore and Jane Kamensky (Part 1).” The New Yorker. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The historical mystery "Blindspot" (Spiegel & Grau) is a collaboration between the New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore, who is also a professor of American history and the chair of the History and Literature Program at Harvard, and Jane Kamensky, the chair of the Department of History at Brandeis. Set in Boston during the summer of 1764, against the backdrop of the colonies' increasing discontent, the novel imagines the lives of Stewart Jameson, a swashbuckling Scottish portrait painter, and Fanny Easton, a young woman whose circumstances have forced her into disguise in order to serve as his painting apprentice. Lepore and Kamensky graciously took a moment to answer our questions. Below is our discussion with Lepore; later today, we'll post our talk with Kamensky.
Lepore, J. 2009. “ In 1929, Parrot Fever Gripped The Country.” All Things Considered. NPR. Publisher's VersionAbstract
It was a classic medical scare story: Parrots died. A few people got sick. Newspapers went wild. Then, well after the outbreak of "parrot fever" was declared dormant, researchers who dealt with the birds began to mysteriously die themselves. Historian Jill Lepore talks to host Jacki Lyden about the great parrot fever outbreak of 1929. Lepore chronicles the episode in the June 1 issue of The New Yorker magazine.