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    Dickens in America | Freshman Seminar 64h

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2019

    What happened when Britain’s most celebrated novelist visited the world’s most celebrated experiment in democracy? This course will reconstruct Charles Dickens’ travels through the United States in 1842. We’ll read his travel narrative, the novel he wrote about the United States, and critical responses. We’ll visit some of the place he visited.  And we’ll produce our own responses to Dickens’s work, including in the twenty-first century’s favorite serial form: the podcast.

    The Election of 1800 | Freshman Seminar 47x

    Semester: 

    In 1800, Thomas Jefferson ran against the incumbent, John Adams, in arguably the most important presidential election in American history.  Students in this seminar will re-visit the election by researching the debate, state by state, in newspapers, political pamphlets, and the private letters of politicians and political observers.  Meanwhile, as the semester progresses, we will watch the current presidential election unfold, giving us ample opportunity to contrast contemporary political rhetoric with the charged campaigning of two centuries past.  

    The American Revolution | History 1404

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2012

    This hands-on research seminar and conference course will take you out of the classroom and into the archives. An intensive study of the political, cultural, literary, and social history of the American Revolution, with an emphasis on Boston from the Writs of Assistance, in 1761 to the British evacuation of the city, in 1776. The class includes field trips to Boston and Cambridge historic sites, archives, museums, and graveyards.

    Historical Methods | History 97i | What is Biography?

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2019

    History 97 is a team-taught introduction to the discipline of history. It is required for all sophomore History concentrators. Six different seminars are offered. In each, over the course of the term, you will explore the historian’s craft by studying and practicing a particular method. In my seminar, we will consider the methods used by biographers. Biographers write histories of lives. Their storytelling is often novelistic but their standards of evidence are those of the historian. They confront distinctive questions: What lives are worth writing? What is the relationship between the...

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    Early American History | History 2600

    Semester: 

    This graduate seminar explores the historiography of early America.  Readings proceed chronologically, from 1492 to 1800.  But since what constitutes “early America” is in dispute, we begin with that debate. While the emphasis in this course is on historiographical development over the course of the twentieth century, rather than on the most dazzling work of the past few years, certain recent trends emerge on this syllabus:  the interest on global or at least transatlantic approaches and the rise of both cultural history and what some scholars call the “new political history...

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    Historical Writing | History 2616

    Semester: 

    An intensive writing workshop for history graduate students across field groups.  Readings consist of essays on historical writing and samples of particularly effective prose.  The purpose of the readings is to help you think about how and maybe even why you want to write about the past.  The work of the course consists of weekly writing assignments that we will together critique in class, paying special attention not only to standards of evidence and modes of argument but also to plot, character, and storytelling.  

    How to Read a Book | History 84e

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2015

    This hands-on interdisciplinary undergraduate seminar is for students who want to think about what a book is and how to read one. Readings include historical and literary narratives of reading by Cervantes, Richardson, Franklin, Sterne, Ellison, and Bradbury, together with paper-making, printing, and research exercises in Harvard library and museum collections.  Jointly taught by Jill Lepore (History) and Leah Price (English).

    Major Works in American Studies | Am Stud 200

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2014

    A survey of the field, with an emphasis on the range of interdisciplinary methods in the humanities, history, and social sciences.  Required of first and second-year graduate students in American Studies and open to others by permission of the instructor.

    Introduction to American Studies | History 1400

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2014

    The course is designed primarily for students interested in further study in the field, but all students are welcome. We cover topics, from the seventeenth- to the twenty-first century, in political, social, intellectual, and cultural history. Students read both primary and secondary materials, and receive intensive guidance for their writing. Taught jointly by Jill Lepore (History) and Louis Menand (English). Note: Ninety-minute lecture-discussion, plus one-hour section led by the instructors. 

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