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    The History of Evidence | History 1916 | Harvard Law School 2694

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2018

    This course, offered at the Harvard Law School and jointly in the college (open to advanced undergraduates), will examine and compare the rules and standards of evidence in law, history, science, and journalism. What counts as proof in these fields varies and has changed over time, often wildly. Emphasis will be on the histories of Western Europe and the United States, from the middle ages to the present, with an eye toward understanding how ideas about evidence shape criminal law and with special attention to the rise of empiricism in the nineteenth century, the questioning of truth in...

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    The Dickens Log | History 92r

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2015

    This class, which was offered in Spring 2015, is directed research. As a final project, the students in the class together wrote and performed a podcast, chronicling Charles Dickens's travels to the United States in 1842. You can listen to their podcast here, via SoundCloud. Copyright in this podcast is held by the students who created it; it is not to be reproduced.

    Freshman Seminar 62G | The Rise and Fall of the Machine

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2018

    This freshman seminar investigates the history of six modern machines—the train, the camera, the radio, the mainframe computer, the personal computer, and the Internet—to trace shifting ideas about the relationship between technology and progress. Machines like these do a lot of things: they document the world; they advance scientific research; they make goods cheaper; they accelerate transportation and communication; they produce knowledge and diffuse information. Do they make the world a better place? Boosters and critics have debated this question since the Enlightenment. This hands-...

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    Harvard Law School | Reading Group | The Second Amendment

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2019
    Reading and discussion of the origins of the Second Amendment and its course through the courts as well as in party politics and in American culture more broadly. Course material will consist of both primary documents, dating back to the seventeenth century, and of legal and historical scholarship, including not only on the Second Amendment itself but on the history of guns, gun ownership, gun rights, and mass shootings.

    Gen Ed 1002 | The Democracy Project

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    The United States is founded on the idea of equality but equality has always been elusive and has only ever been achieved through struggle, argument, and action. This course examines American history--especially the history of race, immigration, and constitutional justice--through historical analysis, democratic deliberation, and public-minded projects...

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    Dissertations

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Allison, Christopher. “Protestant Relics: The Sacred Body in Early America.” American Studies. 2017.

    Bell, Richard. "Do Not Despair: The Cultural Significance of Suicide in America, 1780-1840," History. 2006.

    Carter, Sarah.  "Object Lessons in American Culture," History of American Civilization. 2010.

    Cevasco, Carla. “Feast, Fast, and Flesh: Hunger and Violence in New England, 1688-1748," American Studies. 2017.

    Chiriguayo, William. "The Almighty Dollar: American Currency in the Age of Empire." History. In progress.

    ...

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    HLS 3173 / History 2473 The Constitution in American History

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This seminar, jointly taught by Professors Jill Lepore and Kenneth Mack, will examine the political and legal history of the U.S. Constitution with an eye toward considering how ordinary people have fought to participate in the acts of constitutional amendment and interpretation. Readings will focus on constitutional conventions, alternative constitutions, constitutional amendments, U.S. Supreme Court cases, and the constitutional objectives of political movements across history and across the political spectrum.

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