Comparative utility of a single-item versus multiple-item measure of self-efficacy in predicting relapse among young adults

Citation:

Hoeppner, B. B., Kelly, J. F., Urbanoski, K. A., & Slaymaker, V. (2011). Comparative utility of a single-item versus multiple-item measure of self-efficacy in predicting relapse among young adults. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment , 41 (3), 305-312.

Abstract:

Single-item measures of psychological experiences are often viewed as psychometrically suspect. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and utility of a single-item measure of self-efficacy in a clinical sample of treatment-seeking young adults. Inpatient young adults (N = 303, age = 18-24, 26% female) were assessed at intake to residential treatment, end of treatment, and at 1, 3, and 6 months following discharge. The single-item measure of self-efficacy consistently correlated positively with a well-established 20-item measure of self-efficacy and negatively with temptation scores from the same scale, demonstrating convergent and discriminant validity. It also consistently predicted relapse to substance use at 1-, 3-, and 6-month assessments postdischarge, even after controlling for other predictors of relapse (e.g., controlled environment), whereas global or subscale scores of the 20-item scale did not. Based on these findings, we encourage the use of this single-item measure of self-efficacy in research and clinical practice.

Notes:

Hoeppner, Bettina BKelly, John FUrbanoski, Karen ASlaymaker, ValerieK01 DA027097-02/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/K01 DA027097-03/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/K01DA027097/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/L30 DA025511-02/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/R21 AA018185-01A2/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/R21AA018185/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/J Subst Abuse Treat. 2011 Oct;41(3):305-12. Epub 2011 Jun 22.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 02/15/2017