A multivariate process model of adolescent 12-step attendance and substance use outcome following inpatient treatment

Citation:

Kelly, J. F., Myers, M. G., & Brown, S. A. (2000). A multivariate process model of adolescent 12-step attendance and substance use outcome following inpatient treatment. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors , 14 (4), 376-389.

Abstract:

A common recommendation for youth treated for substance abuse is to attend 12-step groups. However, little is known regarding the effects of this adult-derived prescription on substance use outcomes for teens. This study examined (a) the relation between 12-step attendance and substance use outcome in the 6 months postdischarge from inpatient care and (b) a process model of how 12-step attendance during the first 3 months postdischarge affects proximal outcomes of motivation, coping, and self-efficacy, measured at 3 months, and how these, in turn, affect ultimate substance use outcome in the following 3 months. Adolescent inpatients (N = 99) were assessed during treatment and 3 and 6 months postdischarge. Results revealed modest beneficial effects of 12-step attendance, which were mediated by motivation but not by coping or self-efficacy. Findings suggest that closer attention be paid to motivational factors in the treatment of adolescent substance abuse.

Notes:

Kelly, J FMyers, M GBrown, S AR01 AA007033-07/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United StatesR01AA-07033/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United StatesR29 DA009181-05/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/United StatesR29DA-09181/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/United StatesClinical TrialControlled Clinical TrialResearch Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.United StatesPsychology of addictive behaviors : journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive BehaviorsPsychol Addict Behav. 2000 Dec;14(4):376-89.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 02/15/2017