A smoking intervention for substance abusing adolescents: Outcomes, predictors of cessation attempts, and post-treatment substance use

Citation:

Myers, M. G., Brown, S. A., & Kelly, J. F. (2000). A smoking intervention for substance abusing adolescents: Outcomes, predictors of cessation attempts, and post-treatment substance use. Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse , 9 (4), 77-91 . Taylor & Francis.

Abstract:

Tobacco use is prevalent among youth with alcohol and other drug problems, yet this issue has been afforded limited research or clinical attention. The present study reports on findings for a cigarette smoking intervention for youth treated for substance abuse. Thirty-five adolescents, ages 13 to 18 (40% female), completed a cigarette-focused intervention and were followed-up at three months post-treatment. Six of the adolescents were abstinent from smoking at follow-up, while 17 had attempted cessation during the post-treatment period. Of baseline predictors examined, duration of smoking and intentions to quit predicted cessation attempts. Smoking cessation efforts had no negative impact on substance use outcomes. Findings were interpreted to provide support for the feasibility and utility of tobacco intervention in the context of adolescent substance abuse treatment.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 02/15/2017