Publications

2008
Goettle, Richard J, Mun S Ho, Peter J Wilcoxen, and Dale Jorgenson. The Economic Costs of a Market-based Climate Policy. Pew Center on Global Climate Change, 2008. PDF
Jorgenson, Dale. “Technology, Demography and the Long-Run Prospects for U.S. Economic Growth.” VOX CEPR's Policy Portal, 2008. Publisher's Version PDF
2007
Jorgenson, Dale, and Mun S Ho. “Policies to Control Air Pollution Damages.” In Clearing the Air: The Health and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China, Cambridge, edited by Mun S Ho and Chris P Nielsen, 331-372. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2007.
Jorgenson, Dale, and Mun S Ho. “Sector Allocation of Emissions and Damage.” In Clearing the Air: The Health and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China, edited by Mun S Ho and Chris P Nielsen, 279-330. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2007.
Vu, Khuong, and Dale Jorgenson. “Information Technology and the World Growth Resurgence.” German Economic Review 8, no. 2 (2007): 122-145.
Jorgenson, Dale, and Koji Nomura. “The Industry Origins of the U.S.-Japan Productivity Gap.” Economic Systems Research 19, no. 3 (2007): 315-412.Abstract

This paper presents a comparison of total factor productivity (TFP) levels between the US and Japan for the period 1960–2004 and allocates the gap to individual industries. We carefully distinguish the various concepts of purchasing power parity (PPP) and measure them within the framework of a US–Japan bilateral input–output table. We also measure industry-level PPPs for capital, labor, energy, and materials inputs and output for 42 industries common to the US and Japan, based on detailed estimates for 164 commodities, 33 assets, including land and inventories, and 1596 labor categories. The US–Japan productivity gap shrank during three decades of rapid Japanese economic growth, 1960–1990. The Japanese manufacturing sector achieved parity with its US counterpart by the end of the period. With the collapse of the Japanese economic bubble at the end of the 1980s, the US–Japan productivity gap reversed course and expanded to 79.5% by 2004. This can be attributed to rapid productivity growth in the IT-producing industries in the US during the late 1990s and the sharp acceleration of productivity growth in the IT-using industries in the US during 2000–2004. Wholesale and Retail Trade emerged as the largest contributor to this gap, accounting for 25.1% of the lower TFP of the Japanese economy.

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Vu, Khuong, and Dale Jorgenson. “Information Technology and the World Growth Resurgence.” German Economic Review 8, no. 2 (2007): 125-145.Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of investment in information technology (IT) on the recent resurgence of world economic growth. We describe the growth of the world economy, seven regions, and 14 major economies during the period 1989–2004. We allocate the growth of world output between input growth and productivity and find, surprisingly, that input growth greatly predominates! Moreover, differences in per capita output levels are explained by differences in per capita input, rather than variations in productivity. The contributions of IT investment have increased in all regions, but especially in industrialized economies and Developing Asia.

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Jorgenson, Dale W, and Khuong Vu. “Latin America and the World Economy,” 2007.Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of investment in information technology (IT) on the recent resurgence of growth in Latin America and the world economy. We describe the growth of the world economy, seven regions, including Latin America, and fourteen major economies during the period 1989-2005. We allocate the growth of world output between input growth and productivity and find, surprisingly, that input growth greatly predominates! Moreover, differences in per capita output levels are explained by differences in per capita input, rather than variations in productivity. The contributions of IT investment have increased in all regions, but especially in industrialized economies and Developing Asia.

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Productivity in Asia
Kuroda, Masahiro, Kazuyuki Motohashi, and Dale Jorgenson. Productivity in Asia. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2007. Publisher's Version
Jorgenson, Dale, Mun S Ho, Jon D Samuels, and Kevin J Stiroh. “Industry Origins of the American Productivity Resurgence.” Economic Systems Research 19, no. 3 (2007): 229-252.Abstract

This paper analyzes the industry origins of the American growth resurgence by examining output, input, and productivity growth of 85 component industries for the period 1960 to 2005. We use this detailed industry data to examine trends in particular industry groups such as those that produce information technology (IT) or use IT most intensively and to perform a ‘bottom-up’ comparison of alternative aggregation methodologies. The data show that while labor productivity growth was strong throughout the full period after 1995, there were important differences between 1995–2000 and 2000–2005. The period 1995–2000, for example, was marked by strong growth in labor input so aggregate output was robust, while labor input and output growth both declined substantially after 2000. IT remained an important source of both capital deepening and total factor productivity growth after 2000, but the contributions were not as large as during the technology boom of the late 1990s. We also show that the production possibility frontier, which recognizes differences in output prices across industries, remains the most appropriate methodology for aggregating industry data.

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Goettle, Richard J, Mun S Ho, Daniel T Slesnick, Peter J Wilcoxen, and Dale Jorgenson. IGEM, an Inter-Temporal General Equilibrium Model of the U.S. Economy with Emphasis on Growth, Energy, and the Environment. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007. PDF
2006
Jorgenson, Dale, JS Landefeld, and WD Nordhaus. “Introduction.” In A New Architecture for the U.S. National Accounts , edited by DW Jorgenson, JS Landefeld, and WD Nordhaus, 1-12. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.
Jorgenson, Dale, Mun S Ho, and Kevin J Stiroh. “Potential Growth of the U.S. Economy: Will the U.S. Productivity Resurgence Continue?Business Economics 41, no. 1 (2006): 7-16.
Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy
Wessner, C, and Dale Jorgenson, ed. Software, Growth, and the Future of the U.S. Economy. Washington: National Academy Press, 2006. Publisher's Version
A New Architecture for the U.S. National Accounts
Landefeld, Steven J, Dale W Jorgenson, and William D Norhaus, ed. A New Architecture for the U.S. National Accounts. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006. Publisher's Version
Corporate Income Taxation and the Economy.” American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, 2006.
Jorgenson, Dale W, and Kun-Young Yun. “Corporate Income Taxation and U.S. Economic Growth,” 2006. PDF
Jorgenson, Dale. “The American economy: Slow road ahead.” The Economist, 2006. PDF
Jorgenson, Dale. “Lean and unseen.” The Economist, 2006. PDF
Jorgenson, Dale, DW Jorgenson, JS Landefeld, and WD Nordhaus. “Blueprint for Expanded and Integrated U.S. National Accounts: Review, Assessment, and Next Steps.” In A New Architecture for the U.S. National Accounts, 13-112. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006. Publisher's Version PDF

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