Legal Writing Workshop

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2018
This course teaches students how to strengthen their writing and analytic skills. Students will write and edit several documents, both objective and persuasive. Assignments may include professional e-mails, office memoranda, client letters, substantive motions, or a brief for the court. The course will cover several aspects of good writing, from punctuation and word choice to sentence and paragraph structure, as well as proper citation use. Course assignments may be used to fulfill the upper-level writing requirement.
OITP: Play the Copyright & Fair Use Game, at ALA Annual 2018 New Orelans, Sunday, June 24, 2018
Expert panelists will make arguments for and against fair use and the audience will vote: fair use or not? You decide! Who will win? Everyone wins when they better understand copyright and fair use
Copyright, Digitize, and Lend: What You Need to Know, at AALL Baltimore 2018, Tuesday, July 17, 2018
In a time of limited resources, libraries are always seeking to maximize their reach with decreasing funds. One way to accomplish this goal is through collaborative digitize-and-lend, where libraries share the responsibility of digitizing materials and all libraries can benefit from the digitized versions. This collaborative arrangement can lead to collaborative collection development and resource mining services. Libraries perceive copyright as a roadblock to this vision, and this session seeks to demonstrate why copyright can be a library’s ally instead. It also aims to provide librarians... Read more about Copyright, Digitize, and Lend: What You Need to Know

Legal Research and Writing for LLM's

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

This course introduces graduates of law programs outside the United States to the principles of U.S. legal discourse and to the basics of manual and electronic U.S. legal research. Students will have an opportunity to practice researching complex questions of U.S. law and writing memoranda based on their research

University Libraries in the Digital Era
University Libraries in the Digital Era. In: Research Handbook on Digital Transformations. 1st ed. London: Edward Elgar ; 2017. pp. 135-159. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The library finds itself navigating a challenging transition at the dawn of a digital era: 2013 marked the fourth consecutive year in which more than 40 percent of libraries in the United States experienced a decrease in funding. The university library is no stranger to operating under financial constraints; major university library systems at Harvard, Columbia, Chicago and more have undergone similar cuts and reorganizations. These changes are being driven in part by the new ways in which people interact with information. It is this chapter’s argument, however, that the digital age will not mark another era of decline for libraries. In fact, with the special place university libraries have traditionally held in law, policy and pedagogy, the university library is now poised to be on the forefront of the twenty-first-century digital movement as it harnesses its staff, collections and expertise to provide next-generation support for research, teaching and access. The topics in this chapter – collection development, modern library space, law and policy, open access, and collaborative case study programs – are considered as representative of some of the most critical themes for a university library to embrace in the modern era.