Association between reduced plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D and increased risk of cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

Citation:

Ananthakrishnan AN, Cheng SC, Cai T, Cagan A, Gainer VS, Szolovits P, Shaw SY, Churchill S, Karlson EW, Murphy SN, et al. Association between reduced plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D and increased risk of cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;12 :821-7.

Date Published:

May

Abstract:

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) (Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis). The effects of low plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D) on outcomes other than bone health are understudied in patients with IBD. We examined the association between plasma level of 25(OH)D and risk of cancers in patients with IBD. METHODS: From a multi-institutional cohort of patients with IBD, we identified those with at least 1 measurement of plasma 25(OH)D. The primary outcome was development of any cancer. We examined the association between plasma 25(OH)D and risk of specific subtypes of cancer, adjusting for potential confounders in a multivariate regression model. RESULTS: We analyzed data from 2809 patients with IBD and a median plasma level of 25(OH)D of 26 ng/mL. Nearly one-third had deficient levels of vitamin D (<20 ng/mL). During a median follow-up period of 11 years, 196 patients (7%) developed cancer, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer (41 cases of colorectal cancer). Patients with vitamin D deficiency had an increased risk of cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.65) compared with those with sufficient levels. Each 1-ng/mL increase in plasma 25(OH)D was associated with an 8% reduction in risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.96). A weaker inverse association was also identified for lung cancer. CONCLUSIONS: In a large multi-institutional IBD cohort, a low plasma level of 25(OH)D was associated with an increased risk of cancer, especially colorectal cancer.

Notes:

Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin NCheng, Su-ChunCai, TianxiCagan, AndrewGainer, Vivian SSzolovits, PeterShaw, Stanley YChurchill, SusanneKarlson, Elizabeth WMurphy, Shawn NKohane, IsaacLiao, Katherine PengK08 AR060257/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/K23 DK097142/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/K24 AR052403/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/P60 AR047782/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/R01 AR049880/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/U54 LM008748/LM/NLM NIH HHS/U54-LM008748/LM/NLM NIH HHS/Research Support, N.I.H., ExtramuralResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2013/10/29 06:00Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 May;12(5):821-7. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2013.10.011. Epub 2013 Oct 23.