Publications

2019
Casaburi, Lorenzo, Michael Kremer, Sendhidl Mullainathan, and Ravindra Ramrattan. 2019. “Harnessing ICT to Increase Agricultural Production: Evidence from Kenya.” Working Paper.
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Bouguen, Adrien, Yue Huang, Michael Kremer, and Edward Miguel. 2019. “Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Estimate Long-Run Impacts in Development Economics.” Annual Review of Economics 11: 523-61. Publisher's Version
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Kremer, Michael, Gautam Rao, and Frank Schilbach. 2019. “Behavioral Development Economics.” Handbook of Behavioral Economics, Douglas Bernheim, Stefano DellaVigna, and David Laibson (eds.).
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2018
Jack, William, Michael Kremer, Joost de Laat, and Tavneet Suri. 2018. “Borrowing Requirements, Credit Access, and Adverse Selection: Evidence from Kenya.” Working Paper. Abstract

 

We study asset collateralized loans for water tanks in Kenya. On replacing loans with high down payments and stringent guarantor requirements with the asset collateralized loans, the take-up of loans increased from 2.4% to 41.9% and we show that the loans had real impacts on households. A Karlan-Zinman test based on waiving borrowing requirements ex post finds evidence of adverse selection with lowered deposit requirements, but no evidence of moral hazard. A simple model and rough calibration suggests that adverse selection may deter lenders from making welfare-improving loans with lower deposit requirements, even after introducing asset collateralization.

 

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2017
Hoffmann, Vivian, Pamela Jakiela, Michael Kremer, Ryan Sheely, and Matthew Goodkin-Gold. 2017. “There is No Place like Home: Theory and Evidence on Decentralization and Politician Preferences.” Working Paper.
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Ahuja, Amrita, Sarah Baird, Joan Hamory Hicks, Michael Kremer, and Edward Miguel. 2017. “Economics of Mass Deworming Programs.” Disease Control Priorities: Child and Adolescent Health and Development 8: 413-422.
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Croke, Kevin, Eric Hsu, and Michael Kremer. 2017. “More Evidence on the Effects of Deworming: What Lessons Can We Learn?” American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 96 (6): 1265-1266. Publisher's Version
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Croke, Kevin, Joan Hamory Hicks, Eric Hsu, Michael Kremer, and Edward Miguel. 2017. “Should the Who Withdraw Support for Mass Deworming?” PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 11 (6): e0005481. Publisher's Version
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Jack, William, Michael Kremer, Joost de Laat, and Tavneet Suri. 2017. “Borrowing Requirements, Credit Access, and Adverse Selection: Evidence from Kenya.” Working Paper.
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2016
Croke, Kevin, Joan Hamory Hicks, Eric Hsu, Michel Kremer, and Edward Miguel. 2016. “Does Mass Deworming Affect Child Nutrition? Meta-analysis, Cost-effectiveness, and Statistical Power.” Working Paper.
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Banerjee, Abhijit, Esther Duflo, and Michael Kremer. 2016. “The Influence of Randomized Controlled Trials on Development Economics Research and on Development Policy.” The State of Economics, the State of The World Conference at the World Bank.
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Baird, Sarah, Joan Hamory Hicks, Michael Kremer, and Edward Miguel. 2016. “Worms at Work: Long-Run Impacts of a Child Health investment.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 131 (4): 1637-1680. Publisher's Version
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Kremer, Michael, and Jack Willis. 2016. “Guns, Latrines and Land Reform: Dynamic Pigouvian Taxation.” American Economic Review, 106, 5 (May 2016), 83-88. Publisher's Version
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Kremer, Michael, and Michael Clemens. 2016. “The New Role of the World Bank.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 30 (1): 53-76.
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Baird, Sarah, Joan Hamory Hicks, Michael Kremer, and Edward Miguel. 2016. “Supplementary Materials for Worms at Work: Long-run Impacts of Child Health Investment”.
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Supplementary material to  "Worms at Work: Long-run Impacts of a Child Health Investment." 

Kremer, Michael, Willa Friedman, Edward Miguel, and Rebecca Thornton. 2016. “Education as Liberation.” Economica, 73, 329, 1 - 30. Abstract

Scholars have long speculated about education’s political impacts, variously arguing that it promotes modern or pro-democratic attitudes; that it instills acceptance of existing authority; and that it empowers the disadvantaged to challenge authority. To avoid endogeneity bias, if schooling requires some willingness to accept authority, we assess the political and social impacts of a randomized girls’ merit scholarship incentive program in Kenya that raised test scores and secondary schooling. We find little evidence for modernization theory. Consistent with the empowerment view, young women in program schools were less likely to accept domestic violence. Moreover, the program increased objective political knowledge, and reduced acceptance of political authority. However, this rejection of the status quo did not translate into greater perceived political efficacy, community participation, or voting intentions. Instead, the perceived legitimacy of political violence increased. Reverse causality may help account for the view that education instills greater acceptance of authority.

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2015
Kremer, Michael, and Edward Miguel. 2015. “Understanding Deworming Impacts on Education”.
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Michael Kremer is Scientific Director of Development Innovations Ventures, USAID.

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