Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking

Citation:

Kremer, Michael, Esther Duflo, and Pascaline Dupas. 2011. “Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking.” American Economic Review 101 (5 (August 2011): 1739 -1774.
Web Appendix_pdf94 KB
Peer Effects.pdf878 KB

Abstract:

To the extent that students benefit from high-achieving peers, tracking will help strong students and hurt weak ones. However, all students may benefit if tracking allows teachers to better tailor their instruction level. Lower-achieving pupils are particularly likely to benefit from tracking when teachers have incentives to teach to the top of the distribution. We propose a simple model nesting these effects, and test its implications in a randomized tracking experiment conducted with 121 primary schools in Kenya. While the direct effect of high-achieving peers is positive, tracking benefited lower-achieving pupils indirectly by allowing teachers to teach at their level.

Last updated on 11/04/2015