Classes

The New Global Novel

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2013

Commonwealth, postcolonial, transnational, global: these are just some of the words we use to describe literature that travels across borders, languages, and cultures. Most of the books we commonly slot into these categories do not fit neatly into a single national tradition – but then, these days, few books do. In this class, we will discuss six novels published over the past decade, paying close attention both to the global contexts into which the novels were received and to the issues of translation, citizenship, nationhood, and human rights they raise. We will ask, and aim to...

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How to Write About Africa

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2012

Instructor

In this class, we will read some of the hottest, best and most controversial writing coming out of Africa - from staples of high school curricula to international best-sellers, Nobel Prize winners and Oprah’s Book Club selections. Throughout the semester, we will maintain a double focus: first on the writing itself, and second on the global context into which this writing is received. We will explore themes of authenticity, identity, history and language along with questions of publishing, reception, canonization and genre.  The...

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Art and Thought in the Cold War

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2011

TF for Professor Louis Menand

Culture of the early Cold War (1945-1965) in the context of political events and intellectual developments. We will be particularly interested in the unintended consequences of Cold War policies and in trans-Atlantic cultural exchange. Subjects include the literature of totalitarianism, Abstract Expressionism, the Beats, the philosophy of higher education, the Warren Court, film noir, and the French New Wave.

Modern American Crime Narratives

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2010

Teaching Fellow for Professor Jason Stevens.

Awarded Harvard University Certificate for Distinction in Teaching

We will cover American crime narratives, emphasizing the hard-boiled and noir fiction that flourished between the Jazz Age and the Cold War as well as the police procedural and the true crime novel. Popular texts will be approached as examples of craft art which have provided paradigms for major American authors, including Faulkner and Fitzgerald. Sources will include films such as The Godfather, Blade Runner, and The Dark Knight.

Introduction to African and African American Studies

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2010

Teaching Fellow for Professors Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Evelyn Higginbotham.

An exploration of some of the key texts and issues in African American Studies from a range of disciplinary perspectives. 

Postwar British and American Fiction

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2009

Teaching Fellow for Professor James Woods.

Examines a range of works, including novels and stories by Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Raymond Carver, Henry Green, Muriel Spark, Ian McEwan, Penelope Fitzgerald, and Martin Amis. Attempts to situate these books in their larger historical traditions, while emphasizing that we are reading a living literature.