Human Rights & Justice

2019
Sikkink, Kathryn, Geoff Dancy, Bridget Marchesi, Tricia Olsen, Leigh Payne, and Andrew Reiter. 2019. “Behind Bars and Bargains: New Findings on Transitional Justice in Emerging Democracies: Research Note.” International Studies Quarterly.
behind_bars_and_bargains.pdf
Sikkink, Kathryn, and Averell Schmidt. 2019. “Breaking the Ban? The Heterogeneous Impact of US Contestation of the Torture Norm .” Journal of Global Security Studies 4 (1): 105-122. Publisher's Version
ogy036.pdf
2018
Schmidt, Averell, and Kathryn Sikkink. 2018. “Partners in Crime: An Empirical Investigation of the CIA Rendition, Detention, and Interrogation Program.” Perspectives on Politics 16 (4): 1014-1033.
partners_in_crime.pdf
The Information Paradox: How Effective Issue Creation and Information Politics Can Lead to Perceptions of the Ineffectiveness of Transnational Advocacy
Sikkink, Kathryn. 2018. “The Information Paradox: How Effective Issue Creation and Information Politics Can Lead to Perceptions of the Ineffectiveness of Transnational Advocacy.” Transnational Advocacy Networks: Twenty Years of Evolving Theory and Practice, 26-40. Bogota: Dejusticia.
the_information_paradox.pdf
Sikkink, Kathryn. 2018. “Kein Grund zum Pessimismus.” Welt-Sichten December 4. Publisher's Version
70_jahre_un.pdf
Razones para la esperanza
Razones para la esperanza
A Cautionary Note
Sikkink, Kathryn, and Krizna Gomez. 2018. “A Cautionary Note about the Frame of Peril and Crisis in Human Rights Activism.” Rising to the Populist Challenge: A New Playbook for Human Rights Actors, edited by César Rodríguez-Garavito, 171-182. Bogota: Dejusticia. Publisher's Version
rising-to-the-populist-challenge-version-final-para-web-1.pdf
2017
evidencehopeful.pdf
Evidence for Hope: Making Human Rights Work in the 21st Century
Sikkink, Kathryn. 2017. Evidence for Hope: Making Human Rights Work in the 21st Century. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Publisher's Version


 

  • Read the Book Review in the New York Review of Books: Have Human Rights Failed? by David Cole, April 18, 2019 Issue, New York Review of Books
     
Timing and Sequencing in International Politics: Latin America’s Contributions to Human Rights
Sikkink, Kathryn. 2017. “Timing and Sequencing in International Politics: Latin America’s Contributions to Human Rights.” International Politics and Institutions in Time, edited by Orfeo Fioretos, 231–50. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Publisher's Version
Human Rights Data, Processes, and Outcomes: How Recent Research Points to a Better Future
Dancy, Geoff, and Kathryn Sikkink. 2017. “Human Rights Data, Processes, and Outcomes: How Recent Research Points to a Better Future.” Human Rights Futures, edited by Stephen Hopgood, Jack Snyder, and Leslie Vinjamuri, 24–59. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's Version
2016
Pham, Phuong Ngoc, Patrick Vinck, Bridget Marchesi, Doug Johnson, Peter J. Dixon, and Kathryn Sikkink. 2016. “Evaluating Transitional Justice: The Role of Multi-Level Mixed Methods Datasets and the Colombia Reparation Program for War Victims.” Transitional Justice Review 1 (4): 1–37. Publisher's Version Abstract
This paper examines the role of mixed and multi-level methods datasets used to inform evaluations of transitional justice mechanisms. The Colombia reparation program for victims of war is used to illustrate how a convergent design involving multiple datasets can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex transitional justice mechanism. This was achieved through a unique combination of (1) macro-level analysis enabled by a global dataset of transitional justice mechanisms, in this case the reparations data gathered by the Transitional Justice Research Collaborative, (2) meso-level data gathered at the organizational level on the Unidad para las Victimas (Victims Unit), the organization in charge of implementing the reparations program and overseeing the domestic database of victims registered in the reparations program, and (3) micro-level population- based perception datasets on the Colombian reparations program collected in the Peacebuilding Data database. The methods used to define measures, access existing data, and assemble new datasets are discussed, as are some of the challenges faced by the inter-disciplinary team. The results illustrate how the use of global, domestic, and micro- level datasets together yields high quality data, with multiple perspectives permitting the use of innovative evaluation methods and the development of important findings and recommendations for transitional justice mechanisms.
Clark, Ann Marie, and Kathryn Sikkink. 2016. “Response to David L. Richards.” Human Rights Quarterly 38 (2): 493–96. Publisher's Version Abstract
The authors comment to an article by David Richards about their paper "Information Effects and Human Rights Data". They discuss the argument by Richards on how word counts are related to coding, the use of Latin American cases as illustrations of how coding responds to the changes in human rights conditions, and the global averages of Cingranelli-Richards data presented by Richards.
2015
Sikkink, Kathryn. 2015. “Latin America’s Protagonist Role in Human Rights.” Sur 12 (22): 207–19. Publisher's Version Abstract

Latin American governments, social movements, and regional organisations have made a far bigger contribution to the idea and practice of international human rights than has previously been recognised. Most discussions of the global human rights regime stress its origins in the countries of the Global North. This article explores the role of Latin America states as early protagonists of the international protection of human rights, focusing in particular on the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man, adopted 8 months before passage of the Universal Declaration. In light of this, Sikkink calls into question the idea that human rights originated only in the Global North.

This article is also available in Spanish and in Portuguese.
2014
Latin American Countries as Norm Protagonists of the Idea of International Human Rights
Latin American governments, social movements, and regional organizations have made a far greater contribution to the idea and practice of international human rights than has previously been recognized. Most discussions of the global human rights regime stress its origins in the countries of the Global North. This article explores the role of Latin America states as early protagonists of the international protection of human rights, focusing in particular on the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man. Histories of human rights in the world emphasize the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, passed by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, as the founding moment of international human rights. Few know that Latin American states passed a similar American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man a full eight months before passage of the UDHR. The American Declaration thus was the first broad enumeration of rights adopted by an intergovernmental organization. This article explores the American Declaration as an example of often overlooked Latin American human rights protagonism that has continued to this day, and that calls into question the idea that human rights originated in only the Global North.
2013
The Persistent Power of Human Rights.jpg
Sikkink, Kathryn. 2013. “The United States and Torture: Does the Spiral Model Work?” The Persistent Power of Human Rights: From Commitment to Compliance, edited by Thomas Risse, Stephen C. Ropp, and Kathryn Sikkink, 145–63. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Publisher's Version
Changes in quality and availability of information related to human rights violations raise questions about how best to use existing data to assess human rights change. Information effects are discernible both in primary sources of information and data coded by two prominent human rights datasets, the Political Terror Scale (PTS) and the Cingranelli-Richards Human Rights Data Set (CIRI). The authors discuss ways that human rights information has changed for the better, evaluate the scales and their primary text sources for countries in Latin America, and compare them with information drawn from regional truth commission data. Extra caution is advised when using summary data to make inferences about human rights change.
Sikkink, Kathryn, and Hun Joon Kim. 2013. “The Justice Cascade: The Origins and Effectiveness of Prosecutions of Human Rights Violations.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 9: 269–85. Publisher's Version Abstract
The justice cascade refers to a new global trend of holding political leaders criminally accountable for past human rights violations through domestic and international prosecutions. In just three decades, state leaders have gone from being immune to accountability for their human rights violations to becoming the subjects of highly publicized trials in many countries of the world. New research suggests that such trials continue to expand and often result in convictions, including some of high-level state officials. This article summarizes research on the origins of the justice cascade and its effects on human rights practices around the world. It presents evidence that such prosecutions are affecting the behavior of political leaders worldwide and have the potential to help diminish human rights violations in the future.
Human Rights Prosecutions and the Participation Rights of Victims in Latin America
Michel, Veronica, and Kathryn Sikkink. 2013. “Human Rights Prosecutions and the Participation Rights of Victims in Latin America.” Law & Society Review 47 (4): 873–907. Publisher's Version Abstract
Since the 1980s, there has been a significant rise in domestic and international efforts to enforce individual criminal accountability for human rights violations through trials, but we still lack complete explanations for the emergence of this trend and the variation observed in the use of human rights prosecutions in the world. In this article, we examine the role that procedural law has had in allowing societal actors to influence in this rising trend for individual criminal accountability. We do this by focusing on participation rights granted to victims, such as private prosecution in criminal cases. Based on an exploration of an original database on human rights prosecutions in Latin America and fieldwork research in three countries, we argue that private prosecution is the key causal mechanism that allows societal actors to fight in domestic courts for individual criminal accountability for human rights violations.
The Persistent Power of Human Right.jpg
Risse, Thomas, Stephen C. Ropp, and Kathryn Sikkink, ed. 2013. The Persistent Power of Human Rights: From Commitment to Compliance. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. Publisher's Version

Pages