Academe

2018
Kramer, Martin. “The Three Wars of Bernard Lewis.” The Journal of the Middle East and Africa 9, no. 3 (2018): 239-245. OnlineAbstract
The career of Bernard Lewis was punctuated by three wars: World War II, the Cold War, and what he himself called “the crisis of Islam.” The article seeks to demonstrate that for Lewis, these wars formed a continuum, the common thread being the struggle to defend freedom and democracy against the forces of tyranny.
The Three Wars of Bernard Lewis (pdf)
Kramer, Martin. “A Controversy at Harvard.” In Anti-Zionism on Campus: The University, Free Speech, and BDS, edited by Andrew Pessin and Doron S. Ben-Atar, 151-162. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2018.Abstract
A review of the Harvard aspects of a 2010 controversy that followed remarks on Gaza made by the author at a conference in Israel.
A Controversy at Harvard (pdf)
2016
Kramer, Martin. “The Shifting Sands of Academe.” In The War on Error: Israel, Islam, and the Middle East, 9-17. New Brunswick, NJ and London: Transaction Publishers, 2016.Abstract

Martin Kramer looks back upon the writing of his book Ivory Towers on Sand (2001)recalls his intentions, identifies what he sees as the book’s merits and shortcomings, and assesses its reception.

The Shifting Sands of Academe (pdf) شن های روان در فضای دانشگاهی (pdf)
Originally a lecture delivered to the graduate proseminar "Approaches to Middle Eastern Studies" at Harvard in 2007. This is its first publication. The Persian translation, also here in pdf, appeared in the magazine Ghalamo, no. 8, Dey 1396 (December 2017-January 2018).
2013
Kramer, Martin. “Boycott Me. Please.” Foreign Policy, 2013. Web originalAbstract

As president of an Israeli college, Martin Kramer would rather face the anti-Israel academic boycott than forfeit his integrity. Published at Foreign Policy on December 19, 2013.

Boycott Me. Please. (pdf)
2011
Rules of Engagement: How Government Can Leverage Academe
Kramer, Martin. Rules of Engagement: How Government Can Leverage Academe. Washington, DC: The Washington Institute for Near East Pollicy, 2011. Publisher's VersionAbstract

For almost two generations, major parts of academe have been alienated from America's exercise of power due to entrenched ideological differences with the federal government. Following President Obama's election, however, signs of a remarkable shift emerged, with more academics serving in policy positions, huddling with top officials behind closed doors, and otherwise extolling the virtues of "soft" or "smart" power. How can Washington take advantage of this once-in-a-generation opportunity to create more structured and effective partnerships with universities?

In this Policy Focus, Dr. Martin Kramer surveys the state of government-academe relations ten years after his bestselling book Ivory Towers dissected "the failure of Middle Eastern studies in America." Intended as a short field manual for government engagement with professors, deans, and university presidents, the paper describes how policymakers can better wield three of academia's most important levers: the clout inherent in peer review, the influence conferred by academic endowments, and the access created by sharing information despite the need to keep some of it classified.

Rules of Engagement: How Government Can Leverage Academe (pdf)