Edited book

1999
The Jewish Discovery of Islam: Studies in Honor of Bernard Lewis
Kramer, Martin. The Jewish Discovery of Islam: Studies in Honor of Bernard Lewis. Tel Aviv: Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, Tel Aviv University, 1999.Abstract

Jews figure prominently in the history of the modern European encounter with Islam. The similarities between Hebrew and Arabic, the parallels between two faiths grounded in law, and the relative tolerance of Muslim rule toward Jews--all these are said to have permitted many Jews to approach Islam with an understanding and sympathy once uncommon in Europe. Was there a "Jewish discovery of Islam," distinct from Europe's discovery? Is there some unifying characteristic to the approach of these Jewish "discoverers"? In this original volume, contributors assess the approaches to Islam of some of the most famous European Jewish travelers, writers, and scholars.

Introduction (pdf)
1997
The Islamism Debate
Kramer, Martin. The Islamism Debate. Tel Aviv, Israel: The Moshe Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, 1997. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Is Islamism driven by religious fervor, social protest or national xenophobia? Is the rise of Islamism a threat to stability, tolerance, and order, or is it the first step toward reform, participation, and democratization? These and other questions are debated by nine authors - leading protagonists in the Islamism debate - from the United States, Britain, France, and Israel.

1992
Kramer, Martin. “The Invasion of Islam.” In Middle East Contemporary Survey 1990, edited by Ami Ayalon, 14:177-207. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1992. Google BooksAbstract
A survey of the events relating to inter-Islamic relations in 1990, with an emphasis on the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait.
The Invasion of Islam (pdf)
1991
Middle Eastern Lives: The Practice of Biography and Self-Narrative
Kramer, Martin. Middle Eastern Lives: The Practice of Biography and Self-Narrative. Syracuse, N.Y. Syracuse University Press, 1991. Publisher's VersionAbstract

An impressive array of scholars, biographers, and critics from the disciplines of anthropology, history, political science, and psychology explore the diversity of approaches both to writing biography and to reading self-narratives.

Introduction (pdf)