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Humanities 10a: A Humanities Colloquium, from Homer to García Márquez

Profs. Stephen Greenblatt (English), Louis Menand (English), Nicholas Boylston (Religion), Davíd Carrasco (Anthropology, Divinity), Melissa McCormick (East Asian Languages and Civilizations, History of Art and Architecture), Alison Simmons (Philosophy), Fall 2019

Profs. Stephen Greenblatt (English), Louis Menand (English), Davíd Carrasco (Anthropology, Divinity), Jill Lepore (History), Melissa McCormick (East Asian Languages and Civilizations, History of Art and Architecture), Jonathan Walton (Divinity), Fall 2018

2,500 years of essential works, taught by six professors. Humanities 10a includes works by Homer, Plato, Aristotle, Sappho, Murasaki, Bernal Díaz, Shakespeare, Douglass, Du Bois, Woolf and García Márquez, as well as the Declaration of Independence and The Federalist Papers. One 75-minute lecture plus a 75-minute discussion seminar led by the professors every week. Students also receive instruction in critical writing one hour a week, in writing labs and individual conferences. Students also have opportunities to visit cultural venues and attend musical and theatrical events in Cambridge or Boston. Freshmen only; open to 90 students.

Taught through the Harvard Arts and Humanities Division. Students who complete Humanities 10a meet the General Education distribution requirement for Arts & Humanities (formerly satisfied the Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding requirement in the Program for General Education) and, when taken together with Humanities 10b, is the only course in the College other than Expos 10/20 that satisfies the first-year Expository Writing requirement.

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Humanities 10b: A Humanities Colloquium, from Joyce to Homer

Profs. Louis Menand (English), David Armitage (History), David Elmer (Classics), Samantha Matherne (Philosophy), Katharina Piechocki (Comparative Literature), Leah Whittington (English), Spring 2020

Profs. Stephen Greenblatt (English), Louis Menand (English), Jay Harris (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations), Sean Kelly (Philosophy), Deidre Lynch (English), Leah Whittington (English), Spring 2019

Profs. Stephen Greenblatt (English), Louis Menand (English), David Armitage (History), Jay Harris (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations), Racha Kirakosian (German, Religion), Melissa McCormick (East Asian Languages and Civilizations), Spring 2018

2,500 years of essential works, taught by six professors. Humanities 10b is open only to students who completed Humanities 10a in Fall 2017. Humanities 10b includes works by Joyce, Nietzsche, Shelley, Rousseau, More, Machiavelli, Murasaki, Bai Juyi, Augustine, Plato, Sophocles, and Homer. One 90-minute lecture plus a 90-minute discussion seminar led by the professors every week. Students continue to receive instruction in critical writing one hour a week, in writing labs and individual conferences. Students also have opportunities to visit cultural venues and attend musical and theatrical events in Cambridge or Boston. Freshmen only; open to 90 students.

Taught through the Harvard Arts and Humanities Division. When taken together with Humanities 10a, the only course in the College other than Expos 10/20 that satisfies the first-year Expository Writing requirement (formerly satisfied the Culture and Belief requirement in the Program for General Education).

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Literature and Revolution: Great Books in Moments of Cultural Transformation

Prof. James Simpson, Spring 2011

What is the function of literary texts in moments, from Plato to the Russian Revolution, that promise total, enlightened societal transformation? Each week, this course will focus on two texts related to selected "revolutionary" moments, one philosophical and one literary. Literary texts do not participate easily in the revolutionary order. They resist the textual simplicities of philosophy. Which do we trust: philosophy or literature? Texts include many found in traditional "Great Books" courses: Plato, Virgil, Augustine, Dante, Luther, Milton, Swift, Rousseau, Twain, Kant, Marx, and Chekov, among others.

Taught through the Harvard College General Education Program, Aesthetic and Interpretive Understanding Division.