Courses

History and Theory of Social Anthropology (ANTH 2650b)

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This graduate proseminar explores the political economy of anthropological knowledge production. It examines anthropology’s relation to alterity and sociality in different historical contexts, in the colony and in the metropole, in the socialist East and the capitalist West, at the center and at the periphery. Anthropology has long been seen as a quintessentially “Western discourse” problematically aligned with the ideologies of power. Rather than approach the discipline as a unified whole, however, this...

Read more about History and Theory of Social Anthropology (ANTH 2650b)

Kinship, Citizenship, and Belonging (ANTH 1988)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018
The domains of family life, kinship, and intimacy represent central sites for the construction and contestation of social and political belonging. This course introduces students to classic and contemporary theories of society, kinship, and citizenship by way of theorizing how economic production, sovereignty, and everyday life emerge through the regulation of relatedness. Anthropologists of the late nineteenth century and of the first half of the twentieth century turned kinship into a key domain for understanding social cohesion and political organization. In the past three decades –... Read more about Kinship, Citizenship, and Belonging (ANTH 1988)

Sexuality and Political Economy (ANTH 2614)

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2018
This graduate seminar explores the complex links between sexuality, capitalism, and power. Sexuality has long represented a central domain for the creation and contestation of subjects and sovereignties, labor and capital, relatedness and belonging, desire and development, security and violence. With the publication of Michel Foucault’s "The History of Sexuality" (1976), the role of modern forms of power that work to discipline subjects and regulate populations has become central to how scholars conceptualize sexuality. By comparison, however, the relation between sexuality, the capitalist... Read more about Sexuality and Political Economy (ANTH 2614)

Sex, Money, and Power in the Postcolonial World (Freshman Seminar 70S)

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2018

With globalization, sex—everywhere—has become more central to who we are as citizens and consumers, how we gain rights and resources, and how we relate to others, as members of a specific race, ethnicity, region, or culture. Worldwide, states invest or disinvest in people according to how they have sex, adopt gender identities, or sustain sexual morality. Terrorist organizations claim to use violence to reestablish bastions of piety and sexual propriety; various populist movements imagine immigrants and refugees to threaten their societies, in part, by failing to uphold the sexual norms...

Read more about Sex, Money, and Power in the Postcolonial World (Freshman Seminar 70S)

Anthropology and Africa (AAAS 105x)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016
This undergraduate course explores the links between race, empire, and the production of anthropological knowledge about Africa. Africa has occupied a central place in the making of anthropology as a discipline. Ethnographic studies of African contexts generated leading theories of kinship and society, money and economy, ritual and religion, violence, law, and political order. And, while anthropologists have often used their work to critique racism and social injustice, the discipline of anthropology has been, at times, accused of being the “handmaiden of colonialism” – its discourses... Read more about Anthropology and Africa (AAAS 105x)

Ethnographic Research Methods (ANTH 1610)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015
Extensive field research has defined social anthropology since the beginning of the twentieth century. Despite the long-lived centrality of field research to the discipline, anthropologists have continuously reexamined the accuracy, analytical relevance, and ethical implications of their methodological repertoire. The course begins by introducing students to key theoretical questions that anthropologists have raised about the nature of “fieldwork” in the contemporary world. For example: How can ethnographic research capture the dynamics of globalization? Can multi-sited fieldwork denaturalize... Read more about Ethnographic Research Methods (ANTH 1610)