Teaching

Japanese Books: From Manuscript to Print

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2021

Free, self-paced, online course offered through EdX/HarvardX. This course expands the definition of the “book” to include scrolls and albums, focusing on the reading experience of a variety of formats in Japan. In the first unit, examine rare and beautifully preserved manuscripts in the Harvard Art Museums and study the material properties of Japanese books and scrolls, binding techniques, and important terminology. An examination of the illustrated scroll comes next, through a unit on the short story and visual storytelling in premodern Japan. The course concludes with The Tale...

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JAPNLIT 124: The Tale of Genji in Word and Image

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

The Tale of Genji, written by the Japanese woman Murasaki Shikibu (ca. 1000), is one of the most sophisticated works of literature in the world. It uncannily anticipates all of the richness and psychological complexity associated with the eighteenth-century novel. And yet to view this premodern Japanese text according to anachronistic categories or presentist viewpoints is to foreclose on its ability to expand interpretive possibilities and to consider alternatives to standard narratives of literary history. 

This course examines the prose and poetry of Genji...

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EASTD97AB

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Explores themes, topics, and concepts essential to studying the East Asian region in all of its diversity and complexity, and introduces students to a range of methodologies providing tools for critical thinking applicable to all future academic work. The focus is on thinking about and with East Asian cultures on their own terms (foregrounding texts and voices within the region), as a way to de-center Eurocentric notions and narratives and to grapple with persistent stereotypes and generalizations.

The syllabus is organized around a series of “keywords”...

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EASTD 220R: Medieval Japanese Picture Scrolls

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020
In this advanced seminar, primarily for graduate students with the ability to read classical and modern Japanese, we'll examine a small selection of narrative picture scrolls (emaki) dating between the 12th to the 16th centuries. As a type of illustrated book, emaki open onto issues of reader response, cognitive literary theory, naratology, and text-image relationships in the premodern period. Emaki also contain some of the most compelling and sophisticated forms of visual storytelling produced anywhere in the world,... Read more about EASTD 220R: Medieval Japanese Picture Scrolls

HAA 18K: Introduction to Japanese Art

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

This course surveys artistic production in Japan from the prehistoric period to the twenty-first century. The goal is not to define the national or “Eastern” character of Japanese art, but to interrogate manifestations of human creativity produced in the archipelago on their own terms. Analyze key examples of painting, prints, sculpture, and architecture, while also exploring calligraphy, garden design, ceramics, performance art, and fashion. Essential themes include the relationship between art and sociopolitical development, the complexities of Sino-Japanese cultural exchange, and the...

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HAA 100R Sophomore Excursion Course: India

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020
The HAA excursion course introduces sophomore concentrators to on-site art and architecture through the case study of a particular geographic and cultural area. This year the plan was to visit India during spring break. The first half of the semester consists of an introduction to the historical, religious and cultural contexts of monuments and sites to be visited during the excursion. A few thematic threads of the course include the issue of scale, siting and ecology, religion and politics, and gendered space and representation. Students are assigned... Read more about HAA 100R Sophomore Excursion Course: India

EASTD 261: Advanced Readings in East Asian Art

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

This is a seminar for advanced graduate students in East Asian art (and adjacent fields) focusing on reading secondary and primary sources in Japanese, as well as recent scholarship and theoretical texts in English. The topic will change each semester to accommodate the research projects, general exam fields, and interests of the participants. In addition to examining the state of the field of East Asian art history, the goal is to provide instruction in practical areas such as deciphering calligraphic texts (kuzushiji), improving bibliographic skills, and mastering specialized...

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EASTD 152: Tea in Japan / America

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2019

This undergraduate seminar examines the history, culture, and practice of the Japanese tea ceremony (chanoyu) and its reception in the United States. What began as a ritualized preparation of tea, by the medieval period had developed into a wide-ranging cultural practice the study of which opens onto issues of Japanese aesthetics, political history, and philosophy. Common perceptions of chanoyu today, however, are often filtered through the lens of its first systematic presentation in the United States, Okakura Tenshin’s Book of Tea (1906). With this in mind, the course takes advantage...

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HUM 10 A: A Humanities Colloquium: From Homer to García Márquez

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

In Hum 10, first-year undergraduates study and discuss important works of literature, philosophy, and the arts. They receive intensive training in writing critical papers. And they  have the opportunity to experience current cultural events at Harvard and in the Boston area. Hum 10 is a two-part series: Hum 10a includes works from the ancient world to the present, chronologically. Hum 10b begins with a work of literary modernism and moves backward in time to the ancient world. Professors run both lectures and seminars. The course is designed for students...

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JAPNHIST 240: Museum Research in Japanese Art

Semester: 

N/A

An advanced graduate seminar that examines works in the Harvard Art Museums in art historical, literary, and religious context in preparation for publication and future exhibitions. Past seminars have focused on the celebrated thirteenth-century sculpture of Shōtoku Taishi (99.1979.1), the texts, sculptures, and relics, once stored inside the statue, and how the ensemble sheds new light on Kamakura religious history, charismatic monks such as Eison and Ippen, and the meaning behind dedicatory offerings by nuns and...

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