Teaching

GSD 05211. Cities by Design II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2015

Teaching fellow for a course (jointly led by Profs. Eve Blau, Sibel Bozdogan, Julie Buckler, Alex Krieger, and Rahul Mehrotra) required among graduate students in urban design. The course covered the histories of five cities--Boston, Berlin, Moscow, Mumbai, and Istanbul--engaging issues as diverse as planning bureaucracies and their varying scales of intervention, the influence of political ideology on urban form, demographic pressures and the problem of housing, real estate development in neoliberal economies, and the representation of the city in the cinematic imagination.

HAA 11. Landmarks of World Architecture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2013

Head Teaching Fellow for an undergraduate survey course (led by Prof. K. Michael Hays) covering the history of specific architectural monuments in contexts as diverse as Umayyad Damascus and Spain, late-antique, medieval and Renaissance Europe,  Mughal India, nineteenth-century Britain and France, and the contemporary United States.

GSD 04223. Fourth Factory: The Material Imagination and the Materialism of Architecture

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2012

Teaching Fellow for course (led by Prof. Joan Ockman) on the interrelations of architectural form and materiality, as well as industrial production and post-industrial production in the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries. Special attention given to Marxist thought as a critical analytical framework. An array of exemplary figures (among them Louis Sullivan, Thorstein Veblen, Adolf Loos, Viktor Shklovsky, Wyndham Lewis, Mies van der Rohe, Siegfried Kracauer, Georges Bataille, Asger Jorn, Arne Jacobsen, Jacques Tati, and Manfredo Tafuri) were considered and related to more recent discourses...

Read more about GSD 04223. Fourth Factory: The Material Imagination and the Materialism of Architecture

MEDVLSTD 107. Authority and Invention: Medieval Art and Architecture

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2012

Head Teaching Fellow for a course (led by Prof. Christine Smith) which surveyed masterworks of art and architecture in Western Europe from the decline of Rome to the dawn of the Italian Renaissance, and which explored the creative tension between the impulse to originality and the authority of classical models in the search for new art forms. Emphasis given to representative works considered in their totality (architecture, painting, sculpture, and minor arts) as experiential wholes; and on the plurality of geographical and cultural contexts (Italy, Germany, France, England, and Spain).