A Cohesin-Based Partitioning Mechanism Revealed upon Transcriptional Inactivation of Centromere

Citation:

Tsabar M, Haase J, Harrison B, Snider CE, Eldridge B, Kaminsky L, Hine RM, Haber JE, and Bloom K. 4/29/2016. “A Cohesin-Based Partitioning Mechanism Revealed upon Transcriptional Inactivation of Centromere.” PLoS Genetics, 12, 4. Publisher's Version

Abstract:

Transcriptional inactivation of the budding yeast centromere has been a widely used tool in studies of chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. In haploid cells when an essential chromosome contains a single conditionally inactivated centromere (GAL-CEN), cell growth rate is slowed and segregation fidelity is reduced; but colony formation is nearly 100%. Pedigree analysis revealed that only 30% of the time both mother and daughter cell inherit the GAL-CEN chromosome. The reduced segregation capacity of the GAL-CEN chromosome is further compromised upon reduction of pericentric cohesin (mcm21∆), as reflected in a further diminishment of the Mif2 kinetochore protein at GAL-CEN. By redistributing cohesin from the nucleolus to the pericentromere (by deleting SIR2), there is increased presence of the kinetochore protein Mif2 at GAL-CEN and restoration of cell viability. These studies identify the ability of cohesin to promote chromosome segregation via kinetochore assembly, in a situation where the centromere has been severely compromised.

Last updated on 03/21/2017